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Teresa Reversed Her Diabetes!

 

I am VERY honored to introduce y’all to a very special friend of mine.  I have known Teresa since our children were in kindergarten together, about 25  years ago.  She recently reached out to KetoNurses, looking for something different.  Here is her story in her words.

Teresa Toten, July, 2017

 

My name is Teresa, and I live in rural Mississippi.  I am a wife, a mother of four boys, and a grandmother to four.  Over the years, I have worked and taken care of my family, but I really did not pay attention to my health.  My weight slowly continued to creep up on me; after the birth of my children, I never really did go back to my pre-pregnancy weight.  I accepted the “fluffiness” as my new norm.  I worked, I came home, and the cycle repeated itself daily for years, leaving little time for exercise.

 

I have worked as a legal assistant for almost 17 years, during which time most of my work surrounded workers’ compensation claims and social security disability claims.  Little did I know, that I would also be injured on the job.  On February 20th, 2015, I underwent a multi-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF).  Recovery was slow and painful; in addition, I suffered another injury just weeks after my ACDF surgery – this time to my sternoclavicular (shoulder) joint and collarbone.  The doctor felt that the best course of action would be to undergo steroid injections along with trigger point injections.  Over the course of the next two years, I underwent many of these injections with little to no relief.

June, 2017

In July, 2016, I noticed that I was losing weight without trying; my hair was thinning and falling out in clumps; my face was red and splotchy; my vision was rapidly blurring, and I just all-around did not feel good at all.  I assumed that I was having an issue with my thyroid as thyroid problems do run in my family.  So, in August, 2016, I decided to see a doctor about my concerns.  He ordered the usual rounds of blood work and said he’d get back to me within a few days with the results.  Two days passed, and I received a call from the doctor’s office and said I needed to come in immediately to discuss the results.  I just knew it was my thyroid but at least I had an answer.

 

Day 1 of Keto Nutrition, April, 2017

I went in to the appointment the next morning, and he asked me if anyone had ever talked to me about the big “D”.  I must have looked confused so he patted me on the knee and said that it was diabetes.  We discussed my family history of diabetes (grandmother was diabetic; mother was hypoglycemic).  We discussed my personal history, my eating habits, my lack of exercise, my weight (200 pounds) and my recent surgery and ongoing injections.  He was concerned that my workers’ compensation doctor had not disclosed to me the dangers of rising blood glucose levels while on the injections, and I had been getting them for two years. He told me that my A1C was 12.8.  He explained to me that my blood was telling him the average blood glucose over the last three months was around 375; he also told me that those numbers were not good at all.  He immediately started me on Metformin ER, 500 mg twice a day but also wanted to test my kidney function before beginning.  The results came in… kidneys were okay.  So, he started me out on a long acting one called Tresiba.  I started out at 10 units.  My numbers remained high.  The next week, he added 2 units.  My numbers continued to climb.  My fasting blood glucose levels remained above 200.  My afternoon glucose levels barely dropped.  Insulin dosage increased.  So, after months of trying to stabilize my blood glucose levels, he added Novolog at mealtime.  This addition of mealtime insulin helped my afternoon blood glucose numbers come down a bit, but not where they needed to be.  So, he increased my Metformin to 2000 mg a day.

 

May, 2017

I attended every class that this small town offered to help me learn to manage my diabetes.  I followed the ADA guidelines to the letter.  My numbers continued to rise even though I was eating the way a diabetic is instructed to do.  I just did not understand why I could not get a grasp on my health, and this diabetes was trying to take over my life.  I meticulously kept a log of what I would eat on a daily basis, making sure that I had the proper amounts of protein, carbs and vegetables per the ADA recommendations.  My numbers continued to rise.  Yes, I managed to lose a few pounds in the process but was still grossly overweight at 188 pounds.
So, in frustration and heartache, I reached out to a friend of mine here at KetoNurses for advice on lowering my numbers.  She sent me links to articles on the blog, and she added me to a Facebook group whose main goal is to educate people on methods to use nutrition to help lower glucose and reverse diabetes.  I mean, what did I have to lose besides 2000 mg of Metformin, 30 units of Tresiba, and 16 units of Novolog (per meal) three times a day.  I was ready to get my life back in order, take control of my health, and come off of the medication I was on.

 

So, in April 2017, my keto food list in hand, I made my way to the grocery store to start my new way of eating.  I loaded my cart with items from the meat department, and produce department.  I did not shop down the center aisles for anything.  There were no foods in packages, boxes or bags.  There were no cereals, pastas, rice or potatoes.  There were no fruits, candies, cakes or cookies.  The only thing in my cart was good, wholesome and keto approved foods  I was ready to tackle this way of eating.

On day 1, I took a full length photo of myself.  I weighed in at 188 pounds.  And, I ate.  And, I ate.  I cooked using bacon grease.  I added fat to my vegetables.  I made a cinnamon apple butter tea.  I tracked everything that I did.  I measured all of my food so that my logs were precise.  Day 2 was more of the same.  On or about the 4th or 5th day, keto flu kicked in.  My friend advised me to drink salted broth.  I did and I muddled through the aches and tiredness.  Weeks went by, and I continued to count, to log, to experiment with my foods and my fats.  I got the hang of it.  However, it was not until my first doctor’s appointment after I started this way of eating that the realization kicked in.

My doctor made note of my weight.  He made note of my leaner appearance.   But what really got his attention was my blood glucose numbers; they rapidly fell and stabilized.  So, he had me decrease my insulin dosages and instructed me how to decrease it on my own so that I could do it by myself.  This visit was the first positive appointment I had with him since my diagnosis in 2016.  I was impressed.  So, I continued this way of eating.  I began to notice that my pants were looser, my acne was disappearing, my face was losing its puffiness, my energy levels were increasing, and I just felt better.  I discontinued my Novolog (3 injections a day) and my numbers did not go back up.  I was consistently getting blood glucose readings in the 80’s and 90’s which were a far cry from the 250-300 I was used to seeing.  So, I cut back on my Tresiba.  My dose was 30 units and I am down to 14 units per day.  I also saw my doctor this past week, and he said that he was proud of me.  He said that with the way I am going, that I should be off of my medications (blood pressure meds included) within the next 6 months.

My most recent A1C was done last week and the results are in…..  Last year it was 12.8…  Last week, it was 5.2.  What a tremendous drop!  My cholesterol was a little high at 205 but all other numbers were fantastic.  I enjoyed a great checkup, a great prognosis, a resounding “I’m proud of you” and a “keep up the great work” from my doctor.  He said to keep doing what I am doing, it obviously works. So, I will keto on and continue this way of eating.  It has saved my life, one buttery delicious morsel at a time.
As nurses, we recognize that diabetes has always been considered a progressive condition that always worsens, but we are here to offer another perspective and a totally different outcome for Type 2 Diabetes.  While diabetes may remain on your medical chart as a permanent diagnosis, it IS possible to reverse the condition to a point where complications are minimized or completely eliminated. 

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Grain-Free Fake Ziti

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After seeing an awesome segment on “Rachael”, I wanted to try making a low carb & grain-free Ziti. So I began with her simple recipe and tweaked it a bit.  Full of vitamins, nutrition, & healthy fats, it was an amazing dish to finish out the holidays with a bit of convenience and delicious twist of flavor.

KetoNurses Easy Fake-Ziti Recipe

2-3 tbsp olive oil or avocado oil

5-6 cloves of garlic (1 bulb is fine)

nutmeg, freshly ground (optional)

10-12 oz thawed, drained & chopped spinach (can use 1 lb.)

2 -3 medium-sized zuchinni, sliced thinly

16-24 oz full fat ricotta

16-24 oz grated parmagiano-reggiano

16 oz shredded fresh mozzarella

salt & pepper to taste

Start by turning oven on 350 degrees to preheat, & oil or butter your baking dish.   Heat 2 tbsp. oil in medium skillet over medium heat and stir in garlic.  Add drained spinach and break clumps of spinach up as you stir it into oil/garlic. Stir over medium heat for 1-2 minutes to heat thoroughly. Turn off heat.

Fold in the thinly sliced zucchini  & a bit of nutmeg. Salt & pepper to taste.   Fold in the ricotta & parm  & mix well.

Turn out into baking dish and cover with shredded/grated mozzarella. Bake smaller dish (8×8) for about 30 minutes; if using larger quantities, you will need a larger dish, approximately 9×13.  Larger pans will require longer cooking time.  I used the largest quantities & baked my ziti in a 9×13 pan, so baking time was about 45-50 minutes.  It is done when mozzarella begins to appear golden brown. Let stand out of oven for about 15 minutes prior to cutting & serving. It makes a great leftover dish later in the week or works well even as hor d’oeuvres when cut into small squares.

Options:  Brown a pound of fresh pork sausage or hamburger meat and add to mixture prior to baking. I did use ground beef in my version because my husband refused to eat it without some kind of meat.  LOL

This meal has it all! Loads of protein, iron, & vital nutrients for improving health can be found in the ingredients.  In addition, it’s a very filling meal, meaning you can eat smaller portions.  Served with a small green salad, it is a great meal for entertaining or even carrying to a pot-luck dinner.

Rachael recommended a nice white wine for accompanying her Ziti.  I’m not much of a wine chic, so I’ll take her word for it.

This Fake-Ziti is a very flexible base of ingredients & I hope to try a few other twists to it over the next few months!

I have really enjoyed learning to cook with zucchini as noodles in a wide variety of dishes; zuchinni makes a terrific substitute for grain-based noodles & contain significantly more nutrients than any processed noodle manufactured today.  Using “zoodles” as they are called, can also be a great way to get your kids to eat more veggies!

If you try our low carb Ziti, please share photos and let us know how you like it; find & follow our Facebook page – KetoNurses.

 

 

 

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Does Cholesterol Cause Heart Attacks? Is fat bad for me?

For the past 50+ years, many agencies and experts have recommended a low fat, low cholesterol diet to manage diabetes, heart disease, and just overall good health.  However, much of this advice began as one man, Ancel Keys, decided that fat “must” be the cause of heart attacks.  More information on Keys’ influence can be found in Barbara’s blog post about the low fat dogma on Feb. 23, 2015.

Low fat nutrition was thought to be the best way to maintain health, get healthy, and prevent many diseases.  However, after 50 years of low fat eating, we have not eliminated, nor reduced heart disease, diabetes, or obesity; in fact, all of those conditions have worsened.

But here is where cholesterol got its bad name:

In 1955, President Eisenhower had a highly publicized heart attack; at the time, his total cholesterol was 165 mL/dL – normal is considered to be less than 200 mL/dL. According to media reports that were held daily during his recovery, Eisenhower ate dry toast and coffee for breakfast every morning.  He was supposedly allowed 1 egg per week as part of his prescribed low fat, low cholesterol diet.  Even though he continued the low cholesterol diet, he suffered several more heart attacks and left office with a 259 mL/dL total cholesterol level; he died of heart disease anyway.

Over the next several years, food manufacturers began producing low fat, low cholesterol products as fast as possible; trying to keep up with all the media attention on President Eisenhower’s health conditions, hundreds of other low fat foods like margarine, skim milk, & corn oil were developed and marketed.  By 1957, margarine outsold butter for the first time. Many of these low fat products contained a large quantity of omega-6 linoleic acid and in excess, this particular fat causes injury and systemic inflammation within the bloodstream and multiple other tissues within the body.

Presidential Influence…

By 1961, Eisenhower left office and left his mark on nutritional history for decades.  This same year, findings from the massive Framingham Heart Study were released; this study showed that overweight men under 50 years old who had high cholesterol, smoked, and did not exercise were at higher risk of heart attacks and heart disease.  One correlation completely overlooked was elevated glucose; no one seemed to make the connection to high blood sugar, but they made famous the Framingham risk factors, which continue to be included in today’s health assessments across the nation. None of the researchers actually ever made any true connection between the elevated cholesterol levels and heart disease.  The “risk factors” made the headlines and drew all the attention.  The other problem with the Framingham Heart Study was that it did not address the highest rate of heart attacks which was in men above the age of 50.  All of the data presented in this huge and well-respected study only presented data from men under 50 years old, the least likely men to suffer from heart attacks or strokes.  Much publicity and media attention was given to the “risk factors” as presented in this study, while no mention was made of the possible relationship to sugar, or the fact that the healthiest population had the highest risk factors.  All of this activity in nutrition and health led to the huge expansion & reach of the American Heart Association; with all the focus on Eisenhower’s health & AHA’s dietary advice, TIME magazine’s January issue hit the newsstands with Ancel Keys on the cover.  Now, the media has a job to do: tell the nation just how terrible fat is for us, and they did quite an excellent job of it… repeatedly…consistently…persistently…frequently…repetitively…doggedly…

The AHA gets involved…

By 1966, the food industry has begun to taint dietary advice when a member of the board of the American Heart Association published a book, Your Heart Has Nine Lives.  Author, Jeremiah Stamler was a friend and support of Ancel Keys, and the publication of his book was funded by Mazola Corn Oil and Fleissmann’s Margarine.

The federal government’s Women, Infants, & Children’s program, also known as WIC, adopted the AHA’s stance for low fat nutrition for all pregnant women and children; basing nutrition on the low fat mantra, WIC began distribution of vouchers for low fat and skim milk products in 1970. Later in the 1970s, George McGovern organized and hosted a series of hearings where politicians and other government employees gathered to argue the nutrition science, now widely publicized.  While most were pretty biased against fats, none of them, including McGovern, had any real scientific background.  The hearings were argumentative and truly not based on any research studies, but rather, on opinions of strong-willed politicians who were able to influence decisions and entire agencies.

Why didn’t someone stop them?

I know by now, many of you are asking, “why didn’t someone stop them?” “How come other scientists didn’t publish an opposing opinion or research study?”  Well, a wide variety of people attempted to publicize other data; several scientists, including Margaret Albrink, Peter Kuo, Lars Carlson, Joseph Goldstein, Pete Ahrens, and several others continued to report that elevated triglycerides appeared to be a higher risk for heart disease.  Even as far back as 1957, a well-respected children’s obesity expert said, The great progress in dietary control of obesity was the recognition that meat was not fat producing; but that it was bread and sweets which lead to obesity.”

No one could hear the opposition, however.  Keys developed close ties to the White House during Eisenhower’s unhealthy years after the heart attack, as he tried to help “heal” Eisenhower’s heart disease with his low fat diet.  Power and strong personalities led the media where they wanted, and opposing viewpoints were silenced quickly by removing grant funding from some researchers.  Others were simply “un-appointed” to nutrition committees, or touted as fakes or quacks who did not want to follow the AHA’s new “rules”.

Sugar touted as “safe”…

When these low fat rules were actually finally release in 1977, the American Medical Association was quite skeptical and at first, refused to succumb to the AHA’s recommendations.  However, the media hype was intense and repetitive, and by the mid-1980s, the AMA enthusiastically joined the low fat bandwagon. Also in 1986, the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) issued statements that there was “no conclusive evidence” that sugar contributed to disease, and even said that up to 25% of all calories could come from sugars, although this recommendation completely eliminated nutrients, vitamins, or fiber.

As the “war on cholesterol” raged in the late 1980s, statin manufacturers were busily researching and developing medications that would lower cholesterol;  the first one was moved through the FDA rapidly and released to market in 1987.  Since 1990, the rate of congestive heart failure has more than doubled, and some experts believe the increase is directly related to the massive number of statin prescriptions filled daily.

After only 14 years of encouraging sugar intake up to 25% of total daily calories, the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes had begun to skyrocket.  About 80% of diabetic patients were dying of heart disease. While per capita sugar intake jumped from 15 pounds in 1830 to 150 pounds in the year 2000, fat intake dropped from 18 pounds to 4 pounds in the same time period.  Obesity had become an epidemic, as 30% of Americans were overweight and still gaining weight.

Massive media blitz…

Between 2005 – 2009, many organizations including the Corn Growers Association has begun spending millions of dollars, lobbying Congress and the public with the massive media message that high fructose corn syrup is safe for toddlers and children. Gyms and workout centers abound in every community, as Gary Taubes became an advocate of exercise to lose weight and be healthy.  Nutrition and health science has become quite the booming business, all while the incidence of heart disease continues to climb, and the rate of diabetes has jumped from 1 in 30 Americans in 1910, to 1 in 3 by 2008.

Just a few weeks ago, in early 2015, the US Dietary Advisory Council issued a statement saying that it would retract its recommendation for a low cholesterol diet.  However, in the body of the news release, the Council continues to advocate for a diet high in unsaturated fats like those found in nuts, fish, olives, & vegetable oils.  While this statement is the FIRST baby step in the right direction, the low carb science continues to build support in a wide array of settings.  Small journals publish articles and studies, but mainstream medical journals continue refusing to print these studies, likely because millions of advertising dollars come from statin & insulin makers.  Social media has become a source of nutrition advice and specialized groups have developed on Facebook & Twitter, where patients have taken control of their own health.  They share stories of medical providers who refuse to listen to reason and dieticians who teach them how to eat 130 – 150 grams of carbohydrates DAILY, while taking multiple medications to help manage the elevated glucose readings and life-changing complications like vision loss, nerve pain, and kidney failure.  These Americans are facing their diseases head-on, with dedication and persistence; they share meal ideas, recipes, and tips on how to reduce medications, because physicians and health care providers don’t.  They help each other cope with sugar addictions, cravings, and “missing” carbs.  They help interpret lab results when the clinic doesn’t really offer much education in reading the near-hieroglyphics printed out.

Many of these people have completely eliminated diabetes and cholesterol medications using a low carb, high fat nutrition plan.  It’s not a 30 day or 90 day fad “diet”. Low carb high fat (LCHF) is a total and complete lifestyle change that is meant to be permanent.  LCHF offers much nutrient value, satiety or holding power, and much better glucose & cholesterol control.  And this eating plan actually makes really good, logical sense; if sugar is the problem, why not remove sugar from the diet?

Real cause of heart disease…

Over the past 3-5 years, it has become more evident that elevated glucose and high triglycerides contribute to high numbers of heart attacks and strokes; inflammation contributes to another huge portion of heart disease.  Once thought to be safe and free from harm, sugars, vegetable oil, and soy are being linked to increased systemic inflammation within the bloodstream.  Add these inflammatory markers to thick, sticky blood, and even to tobacco use, and you have “3 strikes, you’re out.”  Inflammation, sugary blood, and smaller blood vessels are all linked to the highest incidence of heart attacks, clots, and strokes – so, to answer the original questions…

Does cholesterol cause heart attacks?  Is fat bad for me?  NO… a RESOUNDING NO!  Cholesterol NEVER was found to have any true relationship to heart attacks, as you can see by the history provided here.  Fat was NEVER bad for us; NATURAL fats that come from animals and plants, without massive processing, are necessary for every cell of the body.  The entire cell membrane of every single cell is made of a fatty layer; fats are required for most hormones to function properly.  Natural fats are not unhealthy; the unhealthy fats include those that require many man-made processes.  Corn oil, canola oil, vegetable oil, margarine and shortening are the most common examples of the truly UNhealthy fats.

Healthy fats include coconut oil, butter, ghee, heavy cream, olive oil, pork fats, bacon grease, lard, beef fats, full-fat cheese, avocado, avocado oil, & tree nuts. Start your LCHF nutritious eating plan today!  Eat more fats!!!

Thanks to http://www.dietheartpublishing.com/diet-heart-timeline for a great timeline!

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Diet? Energy Deficit? LCHF?

As many experts have claimed, energy deficits will contribute to weight loss, but historically, patients opt to discontinue the “diet” even after being somewhat successful.  Maintaining a total lifestyle change is required to avoid re-gaining the weight or succumbing to some health condition, i.e. diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, etc.  Dr. Eric Westman from Duke University has been using a low carb, high fat (NOT truly Atkins) for several years now with good success, and is developing quite a following.  Some of the earliest advocates of low carb, high fat (LCHF) eating were deliberately silenced by Ancel Keys’ strong personality and his aggressive methodologies.  (See Barbara’s entry about low fat dogma.) Even from the beginnings of diabetes, ants recognized the urinary wastes from human contained sugars; somehow, “experts” in the 1950s – 1980s totally believed Keys dogma or were coerced to go along.

In recent years, Jeff Volek & Steve Phinney have published nutrition guidance that supports LCHF eating.  I have begun utilizing LCHF nutrition in my practice and regularly am able to discontinue medications because glucose levels are falling into normal ranges.  Patients come in for visits ecstatic that they have lost weight, lowered glucose, dropped cholesterol, and no longer need some medications.  And most are willing to continue this lifestyle forever.

Nutrition advice should NEVER have come from committees that included insulin or statin manufacturers, cereal producers, or any other profession that could gain from the advice.  Current American Diabetes Association (ADA) guidelines urge diabetic patients to consume about 160 Grams of carbohydrates daily.  No matter what type of diabetic you speak to, each one of them will tell you right off the bat that they can NEVER get glucose controlled eating this way.  They will tell you about spikes and lows and miserable symptoms; it is a terrible battle that most patients are tired of.

Diabetes should be looked at like it is an allergy to carbohydrates; reducing the recommended carb intake to 20 grams per day or less actually reverses diabetes and many providers and researchers are beginning to have data to support it.  We have many patients who are now well-controlled using LCHF eating, and they express much gratitude for giving them their lives back.

Cholesterol, diabetes, diet, Fat, Guidelines, immune system, insulin resistant, keto, ketogenic, lifestyle, low carb, NAFLD, nurse, nurse practitioner, paleo, PCOS

Where did the low-fat dogma originate?

So, what started the low-fat craze?  Having been in graduate school to become a family nurse practitioner, we learned to follow the “guidelines” about cholesterol. If a patient comes to us with high cholesterol, we are to implement “lifestyle” interventions. We were told to institute a low fat diet and prescribe statins (cholesterol lowering medications) if the low-fat diet didn’t work (which, of course, it DOESN’T work!)

However, there was never a mention of Ancel Keys.  We were not told the history behind the nutritional guidelines.  In fact, we were to read the government’s  Healthy People goals and told to utilize them in our work.  In retrospect, instead of critically thinking, it was almost as if we were being indoctrinated to a dogma and one with an unproven hypothesis!

It wasn’t until I became a practicing Family Nurse Practitioner that I realized low-fat diets and medication were not the answer.  In fact, I found medications actually caused more side effects and some patients felt that since they were taking cholesterol-lowering medications, they could eat whatever they wanted!

The low-fat diet is unpalatable and low-fat products are loaded with carbohydrates.  Thus, many who attempted to follow this failed miserably.  In addition, with the added carbohydrates, they gained MORE weight, became type II diabetic, and suffered with metabolic syndrome that leads to heart disease!

I found many of my patients to have an increase in their blood sugar, muscle aches and memory loss from statin medications.  This was a catalyst for me to delve into research.  I was not comfortable mindlessly “following the guidelines”.  I became interested in ketogenic nutrition and started to follow this way of eating.  I felt 100% better, had more energy, found that my arthritis did not flare and lost 40 pounds!  My lipid levels are wonderful.

I investigated the beginning of the low-fat craze to find a researcher named Ancel Keys.  He became convinced that Americans were suffering from heart disease from eating too much saturated fat.  He developed the hypothesis (which is an UNPROVEN idea) that saturated fat causes heart disease. He was totally WRONG, as you shall see.

Scientists who suffered at the hands of Ancel Keys…

E.H. Peter Ahrens of Rockefeller University in New York City was an expert lipidologist.  He was known for being very meticulous in his research.  During this time in history, the 50’s, most scientists were concerned with serum cholesterol.  Ahrens tried to open dialogue to point out that cholesterol was not the end-point in heart disease and he suggested that carbohydrates might be contributing to obesity, diabetes and heart disease.  Ahrens predicted the low-fat diet would lead to unintended and very unhealthy consequences. He was absolutely correct!

Ahrens focused on triglycerides (molecules made of fatty acids circulating in the blood).  He performed experiments to separate out triglycerides from the blood from 1951 to 1964.  In each of these clinical studies, when carbohydrates replaced fats in the diet, triglycerides consistently rose.  He worked with a physician at Yale University and compared the triglyceride and cholesterol levels of heart patients.  They found high triglyceride to be far more common in heart patients than high total cholesterol.  Several researchers confirmed this over the next decade.  However, it fell on deaf ears.  He continued to caution his colleagues on the dangers of carbohydrates.

Keys was known as a scientific bully, arrogant and relentless in disparaging any scientist who opposed his ideas.  George Mann, a Vanderbilt biochemist, and associate director of the Framingham Heart Study, was a prominent scientist ridiculed by Keys.  Mann studied the Massai in Africa whose total cholesterol levels were among the lowest in the world.  Mann noticed the diet of the Massai people to be high in fat, yet they did not suffer from obesity, diabetes or heart disease.  Keys dismissed this study and commented that the “peculiarities of those primitive nomads have no relevance”.

After Mann spoke out against Keys’ diet-heart hypothesis, his career took a devastating turn. He was barred from the American Heart Association publications, journals would not publish his work, and research grants were canceled. He is one of MANY who suffered from speaking out against Keys’ flawed research.

Mann admitted that the Framingham Heart Study ultimately concluded that the more saturated fat a person ate, the lower their cholesterol and weight. Moreover, 50% of the patients who had heart attacks had cholesterol levels BELOW normal.

A generation of research on the diet-heart question has ended in disarray….a misguided and fruitless preoccupation—George Mann

The American Heart Association and the National Institute of Health accepted Keys’ hypothesis and gave it strength.  Researchers who questioned it were barred from membership to the AHA, lost research funding and suffered career setbacks. Yet, this very hypothesis is just that—an unproven idea.

The Seven Countries Study

In 1956, Keys embarked on his study.  He wanted to show that a diet high in cholesterol resulted in cardiac disease.  Keys cherry-picked his data and excluded countries that did not fit his idea.Keys claimed his study revealed that heart disease was highest in countries where fat consumption was highest.  Keys purposefully left out countries where people eat a lot of fat, but have very little heart disease, such as Holland and Norway.  He left out Chile, which showed fat consumption is LOW, but heart disease is HIGH.  This highly flawed study gained enormous media attention and had a major influence on the diet of all Americans…to their detriment.

George McGovern

In order to reverse the epidemic of heart disease, a 1977 committee, led by the U.S. Senator George McGovern, instituted the first dietary goals for the country. McGovern, without any medical education, chose to focus on the research of Ancel Keys. The low-fat dogma began. These guidelines received massive criticism by many respected scientists.  The American Medical Association was against them as were many scientific professionals. Americans were told to eat less fat and more complex carbohydrates.  The guidelines were chosen by the United States Department of Agriculture.  How interesting as they are in the business of selling grains.

American Heart Association

The American Heart Association (AHA) was founded in 1924.  It started out as an underfunded organization.  Proctor and Gamble, in 1948, offered to give the association all their funds from the radio show Truth or Consequences.  This opened up vast avenues for publicity and research.  They eventually hired a Bible salesman who devised a very successful fund-raising campaign.  By 1960, the AHA attained esteemed status in the media and medical community and invested millions of dollars in research.  At this point, they did not agree with Keys’ low fat recommendation.

Manipulated…

By 1961, Keys and his colleague, Jeremiah Stamler, a physician from Chicago, joined the U.S. Nutrition committee.  Neither one had any training in nutrition, epidemiology or cardiology.  However, Keys was a master of persuasion and managed to persuade the AHA that the diet-heart hypothesis about cholesterol intake should be center stage.  The AHA adopted this hypothesis and suggested Americans cut their intake of saturated fat and cholesterol.  They advocated polyunsaturated fats, such as soybean and corn oil (so inflammatory, as we know now!)

Discredited studies…

Unfortunately, money talks. Studies illustrating NO causation between heart disease and saturated fat were available, but the food and drug industry has ways to keep these studies from the public. Many studies have been conducted that clearly illustrate NO association between intake of saturated fat and heart disease.  For instance, William Zukel, a researcher, headed to North Dakota to examine patients who suffered a heart attack.  He identified 228 cases with detailed diet and lifestyle data.  He found that smoking was a factor, but could not associate intake of saturated fat with heart disease.

An Irish study examined 100 men under the age of sixty who had a heart attack.  They did a detailed account of diet.  There was NO association between intake of saturated fat and heart disease.

F.W. Lowenstein, in 1964, as medical officer for the World Health Organization, obtained every study about men who were free of heart disease.  He found NO correlation between intake of saturated fat and heart disease.

Credible scientific journals published the above.  However, those who support the Keys’ hypothesis always found a way to discredit these research studies. This continues today.  The pharmaceutical and food industries do not want us to find the truth.

Keys’ research has been discredited.  We are now seeing the result of years of Americans living the low-fat mantra and suffering with type II diabetes, obesity and heart disease.  We can help you change this—one day at a time.

I highly recommend Nina Teicholz’ book, The Big Fat Surprise.  It is well-researched and will give you an extensive background to the corruption in the research that has led us to an epidemic of obesity, type II diabetes and heart disease.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask us!

I want to add a link to a study. Read the “conclusion”. It clearly states there is no association between eating saturated fat and heart disease! What the researchers DO state is that what is used to REPLACE fat in low-fat products may be the culprit. All low-fat products ADD carbohydrates to make the food taste better.

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/early/2010/01/13/ajcn.2009.27725.abstract

 

Cholesterol, diabetes, diet, Fat, gluten-free, Grain free, Guidelines, insulin resistant, keto, ketogenic, lifestyle, low carb, NAFLD, nurse practitioner, paleo, PCOS, Recipes

Missing mashed potatoes? These are even better!

Cauliflower mashed “potatoes”

2 heads cauliflower

1 stick butter

1 eight ounce container full fat sour cream

2 cups cheddar cheese (or swiss cheese, any cheese you prefer)

Salt and pepper to taste

Garlic powder to taste–or add fresh minced garlic

Cut and boil the cauliflower. Mash it up. Add butter, sour cream, salt, pepper, garlic.Add a cup of shredded cheese, if desired.  Place in a buttered casserole dish. Top with shredded cheese. Bake at 350 until cheese is bubbly. Enjoy! Sometimes I add a cup of sauteed vidalia onions or some crumbled bacon! Yum! mashed-cauliflowr-recipe-7231

Cholesterol, diabetes, diet, Guidelines, insulin, insulin resistant, keto, ketogenic, lifestyle, low carb, NAFLD, nurse, nurse practitioner, paleo, PCOS, Recipes

Sugar, Sugar, Sugar…. Everywhere Sugar……

So, how’s it going?  Have you been working on your food diary?  Did you take your measurements and photos? Which bulletproof coffee or tea recipe did you find?  What labels have you been reading?  What labels have shocked you?  Today’s blog entry centers around the nutrition labels on commercial foods.

I hope you have begun reading them carefully. If not, it is time to start studying them.  First off, always check for portion size; many foods come in “single-serve” sizes, but the nutrition label often says there are 2 or even 3 actual servings inside.  A bottle of soda is a great example; a 20 ounce soda actually contains 2.5 servings, although it is sold as a single serving bottle.  So, the 8 ounces contains 100 calories, but the 20 ounces contains 250 calories; the 8 ounce serving contains 27 grams of carbohydrates, but the 20 ounces contain 67.5 grams of carbs.  The 35 mg of sodium in 8 ounces actually turns into 87.5 mg, or 2.5% of the entire day’s recommended intake of sodium.  It’s no wonder glucose and sodium levels are so easily affected by high intake of soda.

The front of a package, bottle, or jar, is designed to convince you to make a purchase.  Fronts of packages have millions of dollars invested in research and marketing.  Companies design labels with ONLY one thing in mind….. to convince you, the consumer, to spend your money on their product.  Companies will use phrases and words designed to trigger thoughts of “health” in the purchaser; words like low fat, no sugar, healthy, low salt, are used on the front of labels for only one purpose – to make a sale.  I frequently tell patients to totally ignore the fronts of labels because wording and marketing can be very misleading.  For example, when I company labels a food as low-salt, all it means is that there is a slightly lower amount of salt than in THAT SAME COMPANY’S REGULAR product.  It doesn’t mean it has an amount of salt that a nurse or physician considers healthy or low enough for good health.

Probably the most misleading ploy of food manufacturers is the use of sugars and the wide variety of names used instead of the word sugar.  For example, pick up the bottle of soda you are drinking; or google a nutrition label of your favorite soda.  There is no sugar in it.  Most ingredient labels include sucrose or corn syrup, not sugar.  That simple wording trick is how MANY food manufacturers get away with selling tons of sugar-laden products without ever including the word, sugar, on its labels.

Did you know that there are nearly 60 names for sugar?  Manufacturers have researched and perfected methods of labeling to meet the laws the FDA sets forth, and yet still “sneak” in ingredients that can sweeten and flavor a variety of foods and drinks.  One of the most common ingredients is “natural flavoring” and these flavorings can be kept “secret” as many are proprietary blends of spices and flavors that the company wants to keep private because of patent and copyright…  But the FDA, nor any other governmental agency requires the release of these recipes or ingredients.  This fact means that there can be additional sweeteners or fats, or other ingredients that you will never know about.

Sugar, confectioner’s sugar, glucose, caster sugar, sucrose, fructose, maltose, galactose, dextrose, dextran, organic raw sugar,  cane juice, cane juice crystals, evaporated cane juice, caramel, agave nectar, tapioca syrup, barley malt, malt syrup, maltodextrin, beet sugar, syrup, sorghum, sorghum syrup, blackstrap molasses, molasses, molasses syrup, maple syrup, brown rice syrup, rice bran syrup, rice syrup, brown sugar, demara sugar, buttered sugar, carob syrup, coconut sugar, corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup, HFCS, corn sweetener, corn syrup solids, crystalline fructose, date sugar, diatose, diastatic malt, ethyl maltol, fruit juice concentrates, golden sugar, golden surup, honey, invert sugar, muscovado sugar, oat syrup, panela, panocha,  treacle, turbinado sugar, and yellow sugar are the most commonly used terms for sweeteners.

There are also  a variety of sugar alcohols that many companies use instead of sugars and corn syrup; some of the sugar alcohols include erythritol, sorbital, xylitol, glycerol, mannitol, isomalt, and more.   While the sugar alcohols don’t typically contribute to elevated glucose levels, some of the sugar alcohols can be linked to some stomach and intestinal upset, like abdominal cramping or diarrhea.  Most sugar alcohols are not quite as sweet as sugars and corn syrup; xylitol actually offers about the same sweetness factor as sugar.  While sugar alcohols may not affect glucose as much as the other sweeteners, consumers still deserve to know the differences in the types of sugars and sweeteners in foods and drinks.

Now that you know about all the sneaky ways of food and drink manufacturers, you can make smarter decisions when shopping for your family.  Reducing the amount of processed and chemical-laden foods can greatly improve your health and that of your family.

KetoNurses’ Homework Assignment #2:  Look through your food diary over the past week or so and identify 2 or 3 processed foods you can live without; read labels and choose to keep foods that are the most natural, with the fewest chemicals and added sugars.  Once you’ve identified a couple foods you are willing to give up, write them down in your journal.  Make a commitment to eliminate these foods; try replacing them with something fresh, from the produce section.  Or increase the fat intake at the meal with which you used to serve that food.