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Metformin – The Good, The Bad, & the Useful

Many people with diabetes, gestational diabetes, insulin resistance, polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), and/or metabolic syndrome (MetS) are taking metformin, a drug that has been around for about 60 years. It is one of the oldest and safest medications used in the management of diabetes. Most people who take this medicine believe that it lowers glucose in the blood, but that is not how it works.  Metformin works in 3 major ways, and these processes result in a lower glucose through INDIRECT means.  Insulin and some other diabetes medications DO directly lower glucose in the blood, but metformin is not one of these types of drugs.  Let’s discuss how metformin works and how it benefits people who take it.

metformin pic for met articleMetformin is classified as a “biguanide” drug and is prescribed for a range of metabolic disorders as mentioned above; it is the preferred medicine and is considered the first line therapy for these conditions. It works to reduce the amount of glucose produced in the liver; it also reduces the amount of glucose absorbed through the intestines, and it improves insulin sensitivity by increasing peripheral glucose uptake and utilization. These physiological and chemical reactions occur at the cellular level, but are very effective at improving glucose and insulin utilization.

The action of metformin within the intestines is the cause of the most common side effect, diarrhea and sometimes abdominal cramping. As metformin is absorbed in the small intestine and enters the bloodstream, its direct impact is seen, almost immediately in some people. Metformin acts to stop absorption of excess glucose and this increased glucose within the small intestine exerts a laxative effect, resulting in diarrhea and belly cramps. This side effect occurs in about 50-55% of people who take metformin, and is the reason that many prescribers will titrate (increase) the dosing over many weeks. Most people can adapt to the use of metformin with a slow and gradual increase in dosing, but others seem to have issues no matter how low and slow the dosing is. Also note that it can take up to 3 weeks for enough metformin to actually lower glucose levels; because its major action is within the liver, one dose is not likely to demonstrate any impact on your bloodstream today.GI tract for met article

Gastrointestinal side effects like diarrhea and belly cramping are usually easy to overcome with very slow and gradual dose increases; I have seen prescribers use a variety of schedules and dosing recommendations. Some work for some people, while others do not. My suggestion is this: if you have GI symptoms related to your metformin use, ask your prescriber about a slower titration schedule. I often work with clients who increase dosing over 6-8 weeks for optimal results with minimal side effects. Other tips that can be helpful:

  • Eat with metformin dosing, no more than 5 minutes between food & medicine
  • Take metformin IN BETWEEN bites of food at a meal
  • Take metformin near bedtime with supper or small snack
  • Some people find a multi-strain probiotic helpful
  • Avoid using MCT or coconut oil within 2 hours of metformin dosing
  • Ask pharmacy about switching brands of metformin
  • Ask prescriber for extended release formula as these offer less impact on the gut

In addition, taking metformin can lead to a RARE and very dangerous side effect called lactic acidosis. In my 10 years as a prescriber, and after having hundreds and hundreds of patients on this medication, I have only seen lactic acidosis begin in one patient; I immediately stopped the metformin, and retested the Complete Metabolic Panel (CMP) which came back normal. Lactic acidosis is an accumulation of excessive acid due to a problem with the body’s metabolism of lactic acid, induced by certain medications or the body’s response to a medication; lactic acidosis is more likely to occur in people with impaired kidney function. It is the major reason that prescribers are encouraged to perform lab tests, like a CMP before and after starting metformin. Lactic acidosis cannot be overcome or treated with gradual dosing increase; in this particular instance, metformin is listed as an allergy on a patient’s chart and never prescribed this medication ever again. Lactic acidosis can be fatal; however, please note that this side effect is extremely rare. (FYI: Lactic acidosis is NOT the same as ketoacidosis.)

kidney image for met article
Kidneys

 

In addition to GI side effects & lactic acidosis, metformin may also contribute to kidney stress; it is sometimes very difficult to determine if the diabetes itself is causing the kidney disease, or if it is the medication. When this confusion occurs, many mainstream medical providers will stop the metformin and perform a trial of other medications to see if kidney function improves. This method sometimes works, but sometimes it does not help. Using our low carb nutrition plan will significantly lower glucose and reduce the stress on the kidneys, often reversing diabetes and kidney disease. Even if metformin contributes to mild kidney stress, it is often continued because of the risk/benefit consideration: metformin MIGHT be contributing to kidney stress, but we KNOW elevated glucose causes kidney stress and ultimately kidney failure; it is why so many patients with diabetes end up on dialysis. So, even if your kidneys begin showing signs of injury, it is often seen as a beneficial medication. Some providers will often suggest a lower dose or less frequent dosing regimen; talk to your provider to share your specific concerns and ask questions about your specific health condition. Kidney stress from the disease AND the meds can be a great reason to keep your lab tests up to date; always ask about your GFR, BUN and creatinine levels so you can be an informed patient.

Recently, experts have begun to warn about the risks of vitamin B12 levels falling due to metformin use. While it is a risk, there is currently no organization or expert that has released guidelines or recommendations for monitoring B12 levels in patients who take metformin. So, this responsibility rests with each individual patient. One of the earliest signs of B12 deficiency is fatigue, and so it’s usually easy to justify the lab test for insurer; the main reason providers won’t order extra tests is insurance regulation. Another obstacle is that by the time the B12 level has fallen below normal, the patient often has more problems that have developed. Some low carb experts are beginning to start their patients on a good quality B complex vitamin, no matter the blood level. If you have seen any of my videos or read my blog articles, you’ll know that I typically recommend a methylcobalamin for the active B12 ingredient, instead of the more-common cyancobalamin. Also note that B12 is poorly absorbed and utilized when taken alone; it needs multiple co-factors, like B3, B6, & folic acid for optimal absorption and use, thus the reason most low carb experts recommend a B complex vitamin, instead of the single B12.

As you can see, pharmacology is a complex science, especially in the context of abnormal metabolism, such as what occurs with metabolic disorders like diabetes and insulin resistance. While I do understand that learning all this information can seem daunting and overwhelming, it is VITAL for each person taking medicines to learn all you can about the medicine and its impact on your body.

What about metformin and other medicines? I strongly encourage you to use a reputable website to look for drug-drug interactions, specifically between metformin and other medicines. I will discuss only a handful of issues here. First of all, we KNOW that metformin ALONE does NOT contribute to abnormally low glucose levels – remember, it works in the LIVER and the GI tract, not in the bloodstream. However, certain combinations of anti-diabetes medicines CAN change the impact on blood glucose. For example, we know that insulin is used specifically to directly lower glucose in the blood; when combined with metformin, metformin IMPROVES insulin sensitivity and because of this action, metformin CAN cause a lower glucose than taking insulin ALONE. Read this sentence again:

When combined with metformin, metformin IMPROVES insulin sensitivity and because of this action, metformin CAN cause a lower glucose than taking insulin ALONE. Other anti-diabetes medications can also interact with metformin, resulting in this “synergistic” effect – drastically lowering glucose to unsafe levels.A1c chart for met article

Keep in mind that the lab reference range for glucose is 60 -100 mg/dL (3.3 – 5.5 mmol/L). These levels are considered NORMAL glucose readings without addition of medication. We prefer for fasting glucose levels to be less than/around 85mg/dL (4.7 mmol/L), because numbers lower than 85 (4.7) tend to show us that insulin and glucose are working more appropriately than when numbers are higher. When patients begin taking anti-diabetes medications, glucose often falls quickly, resulting in feelings of hypoglycemia – even when glucose levels are within this 60-100 (3.3-5.5) range. This phenomenon occurs because the liver and the body have become accustomed to your higher/abnormal glucose readings. All anti-diabetes drugs, including metformin, can contribute to these feelings of low glucose. It is imperative that you check glucose when experiencing these symptoms so that you know the appropriate action to take. If your glucose level is NORMAL, 60-100 (3.3 – 5.5), and you are only taking metformin, the only action that may be needed is to have your normal meal. If you are shaky, nervous, trembling, and have a headache, check your glucose, PRIOR to deciding to treat a “low glucose.” If these symptoms occur in the presence of NO medication (or metformin ONLY) AND normal glucose levels, most low carb experts recommend having your usual low carb meal or some salty broth and waiting for these symptoms to subside. Once the liver and the brain learn to respond more appropriately to your new low carb lifestyle, these symptoms disappear.

If you experience these symptoms while taking medication that DIRECTLY lowers glucose, always check glucose level and treat accordingly with glucose tablets. Keep in mind that 1 gram of glucose will raise glucose about 5 points, give or take; it is no longer accepted practice to consume candy bars, soda or sugared orange juice to raise glucose because these items cause such a wide variety of responses based on the amount and speed consumed. If these food items are consumed in response to a low glucose level, the body’s response can become a terrible day of fighting high glucose levels, interfering with normal physiological responses as well as an emotional & tiring rollercoaster for the remainder of your day. If you take glucose-lowering medication, it is advisable to purchase glucose tabs at the pharmacy and keep them with you and easily accessible all the time.

The maximum dose of metformin that is approved by the FDA for use in the US is 2500 mg daily, and it is usually in divided doses. Some prescribers will “max out” the dose and write the prescription something like this: metformin 500 mg tabs: take 2 tabs morning and night, and 1 tab at lunch. Other prescribers simply write for 1000 mg twice daily. Many prescribers will start metformin at 500 mg, planning to increase dose over time to help minimize GI side effects; sometimes the providers forget to go back and increase the dose. If you have been taking the minimally effective dose of 500 mg daily for a long time, it may be a good idea to ask your medical provider about a possible increase.

Because metformin does NOT directly lower glucose and its major impact on health is improving insulin sensitivity, most low carb providers will not lower metformin dose or stop prescribing metformin when your hemoglobin A1c or your glucose fall into more normal ranges. We typically continue this particular medication, even when glucose numbers are more normal, because of metformin’s significant impact on improving insulin sensitivity; metformin is helping your liver learn to metabolize glucose much more efficiently. Why would you suddenly want to stop teaching your liver about your new way of eating? Some providers may lower the dose, but continue some metformin; some will want to stop it because they may not understand its direct action does not occur in the blood. Most low carb providers that understand the actions of metformin typically continue this medicine until the A1c remains around 5 for 6 months to a year. When metformin doses are lowered or the medicine is stopped completely, it can take 2-3 weeks before you see any change in glucose levels; glucose levels usually do increase when meds are lowered or stopped, but be aware that the method and action of metformin cause a much slower response than say insulin or sulfonylureas.

Other medicines are often stopped or significantly lowered immediately upon beginning low carb eating; it is VITAL that your provider be kept “in the loop” with regards to your glucose levels, medications, and low carb eating. Most of them have NO idea that our way of eating AND your glucose-lowering meds will put your very life at risk if medications are continued at high doses, typically used to treat very high glucose levels caused by VERY high carbohydrate intake. Call the provider’s office every single day if needed. Fax glucose records to them daily. Ask specifically about medications BY NAME when your glucose is within normal range. And keep in mind this one fact: we do NOT treat NORMAL glucose levels. Even prescribers get busy and overlook medication action sometimes. Be very specific with your questions. Example questions:

  • Should I keep taking 80 units of Lantus daily with my glucose level at 96 (5.3)?
  • Is it dangerous to keep taking my 3 meds (name all 3) with a glucose level of 104 (5.7)?
  • I’m taking metformin and (name other med) and my glucose today is now 100 (5.5); what should I do?

As with any health problem or medication, ALWAYS consult your health care provider for more specific information. This blog article is provided for information only and should NOT be taken as medical advice. Your health care provider knows the most about you and your health, but most of them know very little about low carb nutrition. You may have to help them understand that you are eating healthy meat, fats, and veggies, and only skipping non-nutritious calories that raise your glucose. You may have to present them with logs and records of your glucose levels for them to believe you. You may have to help teach them the simple science of low carb nutrition and its impact on your glucose levels. You may ultimately have to make some of your OWN decisions if you believe your safety is at risk. BUT always keep your provider aware of what is happening.

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Keto Shepherd’s Pie

1-1.5 lbs of ground beef

1/2 chopped onion

5-6 chopped, small sweet peppers

3 tsp minced garlic

Allspice

Salt & pepper to taste

1.5 cups leftover cauli-mash

1 can string beans

1/2 – 2/3 cup grated cheeses of choice

Preheat oven to 350.

Brown ground beef in skillet. Sprinkle lightly with allspice once all meat is thoroughly cooked. Stir in chopped onions & peppers and cover. Stir a couple times to ensure veggies cook until just soft.

Once veggies are done, pour meat & veggies into small casserole dish, approx 6×9 or 8×8. Cover evenly with sprinkled cheeses.

Heat leftover cauli-mash in skillet or microwave while stir-frying green beans in the skillet you just poured meat from. Salt and pepper to taste, stirring a couple of times. Heat for about 5-6 minutes. Spread the warmed cauliflower-mash over meat mixture & cheese. Then top with green beans. I usually pat them down just a bit with a flat spatula.

Bake on 350 for about 25 minutes, or just until edges of cauliflower mash begins to brown.

Serve!

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Avocado Fries

Avocado Fries

Avocados

Butter

Melt 2 tbsp butter in skillet over medium heat.

Halve avocados and remove pit. Slice each half into 4 slices. Place in skillet. Allow to brown and then turn each piece.

Allow to brown. Turn heat off and remove from skillet. Serve.

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Reversing Dementia IS Possible

This is the story of a friend who wishes to remain anonymous. His words. His experiences. And they are amazing!

“I joined this group (a FB group) to help my mother who is 69 years old, has had type 2 diabetes for about twenty years now and has developed many complications although none of them are quite life threatening YET. She also has Alzheimer’s which makes it very difficult. She had followed the ADA guidelines yet she got progressively worse and now needs insulin. With her Alzheimer’s the doctor put her on a pump. Either one of my sisters, myself, or a visiting nurse checks on her twice a day to make sure she is under control. Recently one of my sisters or myself have been staying with her. She will go to the kitchen and eat huge bowls of cereal with skim milk or anything sweet or carby that is in the refrigerator so her levels have sky rocketed. My sisters have said its okay.

About a year ago I noticed a woman at my gym who I see periodically and has been losing a lot of weight. Then a few months ago I overheard her talking to some other people about her keto diet. I finally talked to her and she told me about her diabetes, she told me about this group, and she suggested ways to get my mother on it but my sisters did not agree at all and it has created a lot of fighting with them. I will admit that they do much more of her monitoring then I do but about three weeks ago I convinced them to take a break and I have been living with her 24/7. I know this woman Karen at the gym is not a health care professional but I hired her to come to the house to help get rid of the foods that are not on the diet and to stock the refrigerator with good foods. I was very afraid that my mother would start complaining about what I fed her especially because she was always complaining that we were trying to starve her even though she’s over a hundred pounds overweight and was eating three or four meals a day plus snacks. I should add that she has neuropathy and because of her Alzheimer’s she forgets to use her walker and so she also falls.

Karen went way beyond the time I paid her for and cooked some meals and visited with my mother. We never told her that we were changing her diet. After a few days she stopped complaining about being hungry even though she was already eating a lot less. Her blood sugar used to be from 60 to 350 and sometimes over 400. Now it has never gone above 172 and is usually under 140.

I cannot believe it in three weeks. She has also lost 18 pounds and is not falling. The biggest surprise to me is that she is not as confused and her memory is so much better that I can not believe it.

My sisters had been out of town but they came back and saw my mother one yesterday and the other two days ago. I showed them her insulin use which is less than half what it has been and her blood sugar levels. But they both cried when my mother started asking them questions about their trips and acted like a completely different person. She remembered their names and when my one sister said she was visiting her son my mother asked what college he was in. Well, she used to ask when he was going to graduate from high school. When my mother told her it was Lehigh she apologized and said oh yes, I’m sorry I forgot what is he studying? She said engineering and my mother was happy and said oh, just like his grandfather he would have been so proud.

We both cried again because my mother used to ask where he was and why he hasn’t come home yet. The other sister has a house down the shore and my mother asked her if that is where she was on her vacation. She never once yelled at them for not visiting her which she used to do even when they would come every day. And she is remembering to use her walker every single time now so she is not falling.

My sisters are now onboard. I have invited one to the group and the other promises to follow whatever I say. We have not seen her doctor yet but she has an appointment in a few weeks.

I have also been eating this way because that is what I have been feeding her and even though I don’t have diabetes I feel a hole lot better.

I want to thank everyone in this group. I have not said anything before because I’m not like that but I had to speak up now and thank every one. I also have to thank Karen V. for introducing me to this. She never asked for money but I had to pay her for some of her time. I’m sure she would have come out for free because she is so into this diet and promotes it at the gym all the time. I honestly thought at first that she must be selling something but I was surprised that no one here is selling anything accept getting healthy.

And one more thing. My mother has stopped asking for more of her Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal or hot chocolate and now asks for more of the yummy bullet proof coffee which I sometimes make with tea instead.”

—Anonymous

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One Person at a Time – We CAN Change the World

 

It is truly a shame that mainstream medical providers, highly trained and well-educated professionals, continue to encourage hundreds of grams of carbohydrate intake on a daily basis when simple logic shows that the approach is not helping to reduce elevated glucose, decrease weight, lower blood pressure, or improve health in any form at all. For many years, now, the nutritional guidelines have encouraged an intake of 200+ grams of carbohydrates daily, even though our bloodstream only requires 4 grams.  For a person with diabetes and insulin resistance, this advice is detrimental to health.  This recommendation contributes to significant over-eating, poor nutrient intake, and terrible internal chemical imbalance – all of which contribute to chronic metabolic conditions.

This advice does NOT differ for Type 1 diabetics, Type 2 diabetics, or for anyone with insulin resistance. Type 1 patients require insulin administration daily so they can metabolize & properly manage the carb & protein intake.  Type 2 patients often end up using insulin injections because the tablets and diet do not provide enough assistance internally to lower glucose and organ damage.  Patients with insulin resistance often require hundreds of units of insulin a day just to keep glucose levels less than 200.  (Less than 100 is NORMAL.)

Anyone with an over-the-counter glucometer can determine this simple and logical conclusion quite easily. Test glucose prior to eating; test again about 2 hours after eating.  If glucose level changes more than 10 numbers, there are likely many carbohydrates in that meal.  So, next meal, test again, leaving out those particular carbohydrates.  Determine for yourself just how to eat with minimal impact on glucose level.

Even a non-scientist understands the simple anatomy and physiological response within our bodies.

“The problem is that carbohydrates break down into glucose, which causes the body to release insulin—a hormone that is fantastically efficient at storing fat. Meanwhile, fructose, the main sugar in fruit, causes the liver to generate triglycerides and other lipids in the blood that are altogether bad news. Excessive carbohydrates lead not only to obesity but also, over time, to Type 2 diabetes and, very likely, heart disease.” – Excerpt from The Wall Street Journal, https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-questionable-link-between-saturated-fat-and-heart-disease-1399070926, retrieved 2/21/2018.

Why is testing like this necessary? Testing glucose is necessary to gain control of your own illness and health. Medical providers are trained to prescribe medications that are produced and sold to provide a source of steady income to drug companies.  Medical providers need a steady and full schedule of patients in order to provide a steady income for their staffs and themselves.  Medical providers have NO coursework in nutrition, except for a freshman or sophomore course as a pre-requisite to professional medical, nursing, or nutrition school.  There is NO training whatsoever for medical providers to learn how to incorporate nutrition as a part of therapeutic treatment for chronic metabolic conditions.  They never hear the word ketogenic nutrition; they have no idea what normal and natural ketosis is.

That said, mainstream providers do the best they can with info and training they’ve been provided; none of them actually WANT us sick or on meds. It is simply all they know.  Medical providers have guidelines and “standards of care” to which we’re held responsible.  These guidelines encourage us to prescribe certain medications as diabetes is diagnosed and then progresses. We are to obtain certain lab testing at specified intervals.  We are trained to tell patients that an A1c of 7 or less is “NORMAL for a diabetic.”  We are trained to use these guidelines as our “logic” and reasoning, even though very little of the guidelines has any actual research supporting the use; most of the research quoted has been debunked many times over the past 5-8 years by independent experts without financial interest in the outcomes.

Why do our trusted and trained medical providers offer such flawed advice? It goes back 50-70 years.  It started in the 1950s when President Eisenhower suffered a heart attack while in office.  Some strong personalities were already studying and researching diet and the impacts of diet on health.  Ancel Keys is credited with starting this avalanche of low fat diet advice, but others quickly hopped on his bandwagon.  The often-quoted and cited Framingham Study also released only part of the data collected and was used as “evidence” that saturated fats caused high cholesterol which caused deadly heart disease. However, Dr. William Castelli, a former director of the Framingham Heart study, stated in a 1992 editorial published in the Archives of Internal Medicine:

In Framingham, Mass., the more saturated fat one ate, the more cholesterol one ate, the more calories one ate, the lower the person’s serum cholesterol. The opposite of what… Keys et al would predict…We found that the people who ate the most cholesterol, ate the most saturated fat, ate the most calories, weighed the least and were the most physically active.”

This major piece of data was NOT released as part of the study; it only came out later as part of the editorial by the former director of the study. By 1980, so much money and time had been invested in low-fat dietary research, it seemed no one could stop it. Thus, the “Standard Dietary Guidelines for Americans” was published. Later, the American Heart Association also joined in the support of these guidelines; the American Diabetes Association also began to support these guidelines.  No science.  No independent research data. Thus, we the people were “fleeced” and fell right in line with this dietary advice.  We began cutting fats and one of the first fats to go was milkfat, and then animal fats.

milkfat pic          animal fat pic

However, look at what happened to the weight of Americans.

 

Multiple resources offer similar trends in weight; notice the trend of weight gain began during the 1970s and 80s, when low-fat dietary advice was pushed forward as “healthy.”

disease trends

Using some simple common sense and logic, we can review history and data and draw some logical conclusions based on these numbers. As fat intake declined, obesity and heart disease rates increased.  What replaced the fat?

carb intake

474 grams of carbohydrates will be converted into 118 TEASPOONS of glucose – that’s 2.5 CUPS of sugar. Just what do medical experts EXPECT our bodies to do with this much glucose?

Even at the lowest ADA recommended intake of 165 grams of carbs per day, those carbs convert into nearly 7 ounces of glucose – almost 1 whole cup of glucose.

Think about our most vulnerable of our population: our children. Then, narrow down that population to Type 1 children. Current recommendations for managing this illness is to eat high amounts of carbohydrates and to administer higher and higher amounts of insulin to lower the glucose load.  How does this advice even seem normal, now that we’ve seen the data? Do their brains develop normally with such significantly elevated glucose levels? Some experts are calling Alzheimer disease Type 3 diabetes because we now recognize the brain damage done by high glucose and high insulin levels – yet, it’s the “standard” treatment for our most vulnerable population?  Why would we actually WANT our children to consume hundreds of grams of carbohydrates daily, just to be able to dose higher amounts of insulin? Why should we continue to advise high carb intake when it has now been linked to higher rates of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, infertility, and even cancer – even in our children? I fail to see the logic.  Our children deserve better.  Our children deserve NORMAL glucose levels.  They should not be at risk for developing “double diabetes,” because we continue to encourage high carb intake and high insulin use, forcing their bodies to become insulin resistant over time.  These children are one of our most valuable resources; why can’t we provide better advice and care?

One person at a time. One medical provider at a time.  One conversation at a time, we are taking charge of our own health.  We are doing the “research” by checking our own glucose.  We track our intake.  We, at the grassroots level, are doing research that government and agencies and companies should have done half a century ago.  We are cutting out the highly inflammatory grains.  We are cutting out sugar.  We are eliminating the cause of our metabolic disease, and our health improves because we are PRO-active instead of reactive.  We are using food as our medicine…. Isn’t that what Hippocrates said?  “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.”  And our medical physicians take the Hippocratic oath, which includes the phrase, “do no harm.”  I think it’s time we hold our providers accountable for their advice.  What do YOU think?

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Do the Math – Calculate Your Macro Goals

I use the simplest keto calculator available, using IDEAL body weight NOT current body weight – as many calculators do.

First, determine your ideal weight. There are many ranges and charts available, but I use the simplest version from nursing school many years ago. We use ideal weight because we want to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight. If we use current weight for our calculations, then our macro goals will be set to sustain our current weight.

Start with your current height — females are allowed 100 pounds for first 5 feet and 5 pounds per inch over that. Males are allowed the same 100 pounds for the first 5 feet and 6 pounds per inch over.

Example: a 5’5” female would have an AVERAGE ideal weight of 125 lbs, while a male of same height would have average ideal weight of 130lbs. (Let me offer this one tidbit: I understand that many people freak out with these weights, but they really are ideal for the heights. Google images of people from 1950 – BEFORE the low fat craze. People were much thinner and were perfectly healthy. We’ve become desensitized to body weights for lots of reasons, but it has skewed our perspective of what a body should look like.)

Now that you’ve calculated your ideal weight, we will use that number to identify our protein needs per day. At 5’5”, a female’s average ideal weight would be around 125 lbs. Convert that to kilograms using the standard conversion factor, 2.2.

Math would look like: 125/2.2 = 56.8. So your weight in kg is 56.8. For people of average daily activity, the recommendation is 1 gram of protein per 1 kg if body weight.

So, protein needs would be approx 56.8 grams per day — divided into 2 or 3 meals per day, based on lifestyle and personal choices.

For our way of eating, we calculate our protein needs and then use that to determine our fat needs – approx double the protein goal. So you would need about 114 grams for fat per day.

Carb grams are counted as total carbs bc fiber carbohydrates DO impact some people’s glucose levels. Max carb goal should be 20 grams per day or 6-7 per meal.

I hope I’ve kept this as easy and simple as possible. Yes. There are many keto calculators but most do NOT account for metabolic disorders or they are athlete-based, resulting in very high protein intake and excess proteins will be converted into glucose in the absence of carbs — not good for anyone with insulin resistance or diabetes.

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Discipline & Consequences 

I realize many of our followers aren’t religious or Christians, but I am, & as such, one of my goals is to share what’s on my heart from time to time. If you aren’t of faith, feel free to scroll on by. But for those of you who are, God laid this message on my heart and He is pushing me to share it. 

From today’s First 5 app and devotional study: ” Discipline is painful, but knowing it comes from a heart of love makes the experience more palatable. The idea is to live a life that obeys God without reservation and puts no others before Him. Along with stern warnings of discipline, God graciously gives hope of ending exile,“Your punishment will end, Daughter Zion; he will not prolong your exile” (Lamentations 4:22a). I don’t want to need discipline; however, I’m thankful for a Father who loves me enough to administer it when I do and assures me that even though discipline is certain, it’s not permanent.
Prayer: It’s hard to say, but thank You for discipline, Lord. Forgive me for my rebellion. Examine my heart. Reveal my sin. Help me to adhere to Your correction. It is Your desire for me to be holy as You are holy, and my sin keeps holiness at bay. Thank You for being long-suffering and full of grace. In Jesus’ name, amen.”

Today’s lesson is sometimes difficult to understand. Many Christians know God is love and He forgives easily. But many of us forget that He also created discipline and consequences. And we often forget that the 2 concepts are separate – NOT the same. 

First of all, let me preface my thoughts with a couple of things: 1. All disease is NOT the result of poor dietary choices or sin that must be punished. Loads of factors play a role. 2. If an immediate lashing thought crosses the mind, please pause and pray. I have NO ill will, malice, or pride in any of these words today. They are laid onto my heart & I’m trying to share what God reveals to me. 

Diet is an easy area to see the differences in discipline and consequences. And it’s also what KetoNurses is all about. 

Sooo… here goes… 

God gave us a world full of delicious plants for food and animals for meat. He provided our diet for thousands of years before humankind began altering His work, trying to “improve” upon His creation. Many illnesses did NOT exist until the past 50-60 years. What does altering food have to do with sin? Discipline? Consequences? 

First, any time we humans feel the need to alter God’s work, it is pride and arrogance that feed such concepts. That sin requires discipline and has consequences. God has tried for years to speak though a variety of experts and ministers – publishing and preaching His Word – we’ve turned a deaf ear to Him because we have experts and governmental agencies to tell us “more and better info.”  

Second, discipline has been tried – our poor eating habits cause fatigue, headaches, feeling bad, and so on. God is using mild symptoms, Holy Spirit conviction, & feelings of guilt/shame to try and speak directly to us but we don’t listen. We blame busy lifestyles, or work stress, or … 

We ignore the natural laws He’s established, the conscience within us, & the conviction of the Holy Spirit. 

Thirdly, there are consequences. Even when we DO heed His call to repentance during discipline, the consequences of our sin are not typically removed. If we choose to overeat or eat unhealthy, nutrient-poor foods, we can always ask forgiveness from Him. And He grants it freely. The consequences of those poor choices, though, remain. Just as if a murderer seeks forgiveness, repents and is saved by Jesus, the consequences of paying the price remains. 

I don’t like discipline any more than any of you. It hurts. It makes my heart cry out. It separates me from people and from God. I’ve said this often to my kids — “if I didn’t love you, I wouldn’t discipline you. There would be no rules. There would be no consequences.” 

In today’s study, God is telling us the same. He gives us choices. Our free will can choose. Our spirit can submit to His perfect will – or not. He chooses to LOVE us and grant us Mercy either way.