How Do I Eat LCHF?

One of the most common questions I am asked is, “well, what do you eat if you’re not eating carbs?” The answer seems easy, but I find that explaining it can be quite tricky and complex for a lot of the people with whom I share LCHF (low carb high fat) information. First, let’s start with a review of current dietary recommendations.  If you look at the American government’s nutrition advice at “myplate.gov”, you’ll find a colorful plate that suggests half your plate be covered in fruits and grains and an additional serving of dairy off to the side.  The rest of the plate should include vegetables and meat. Notice, there is no longer a place on this plate for fats.  Over the past 50 years, more and more “experts” have recommended less & less fat intake over time, even though there is absolutely NO scientific evidence that supports that recommendation.  In addition, the current dietary guidelines for people with diabetes recommend 45-60 grams of carbs per meal and 15-30 grams of carbohydrates per snack, with 3 meals and 2 snacks recommended; do the math.  45 grams x 3 meals = 135 grams; 15 grams x 2 snacks = 30; even on the lowest carbohydrate plan from the American Diabetes Association, that’s 165 grams of carbs per day.  On the higher end, that’s 60 grams x 3 meals = 180 grams and 30 grams x 2 = 60, for a grand total of recommended carbohydrates PER DAY of 240 grams.  When you realize the bloodstream only needs 4 grams of carbohydrates for a 24 hour period, you quickly begin to see why current dietary guidelines are failing our bodies and contributing to sickness all across our land.  The body must use or store this excess energy; when it can no longer store any more glucose, it begins to make triglycerides from the excess carbohydrates or leave the excess inside the bloodstream, resulting in hyperglycemia, also called diabetes mellitus.  SO, how many grams of carbs do we actually need?  Another controversial response.  While carbs have never been shown to be essential to body functions like proteins or vitamin C, most experts agree that having some carbohydrates is good, ok, or allowed.  I typically recommend about 20 grams of carbs per day for most patients with glucose, insulin, triglyceride, or weight problems.  People cutting carbs for general health’s sake can often tolerate up to 50 grams per day without significant health problems.

Mainstream medical providers will usually prescribe medications that will help lower glucose, but no medication will stop the progression of diabetes as long as an overload of carbohydrate continues. And there is NO medication to stop the “carbage” from going in our mouths.  People who truly desire to reverse their diabetes or stop progression, at the very least, must significantly decrease carbohydrate intake.  Many people immediately think of sweets, candy, cakes, brownies, and soda as high carb/sugar items and usually give them up immediately upon diagnosis of diabetes or insulin resistance.  However, there is a much more complex event at work here, as all carbohydrates CONVERT into sugars like glucose or fructose – both of which are linked to a variety of chronic disease states, like insulin resistance and diabetes.  So, what is considered a carbohydrate? What foods convert into sugars?  All breads, tortillas, crackers, chips, beans, pasta, rice, corn, oats, quinoa, rye, and barley convert into GLUCOSE.  Yes, ALL of them.  YES, even the “healthy” whole grains.  YES, anything made with flour.  YES, all cereals convert into SUGARS.  All of these grains contribute to elevated glucose levels, high triglycerides, and increased states of inflammation which create the perfect storm to ill health in the form of heart attacks and strokes.

Cutting carbs to gain health is probably one of the best choices anyone can make today. Between all the planting, harvesting and processing that goes into producing our bagged, boxed and pre-packaged food items and the terribly high amounts of them we’ve been consuming, it’s no wonder that heart disease, diabetes, and all chronic conditions are on the rise.  Once you’ve decided to cut carbs, pat yourself on the back! That is an amazing first step.  Now, it’s time to clean out the pantry; start by reading every single label of every single package.  Look at the carb count per serving AND the ingredient label.  Do you always ONLY eat 1 serving of that item? Or do you eat 2-3 servings?  Most of us have NEVER paid any attention to this part of a nutrition label, but it’s time we read.  If the carb count PER YOUR PREFERRED amount is higher than about 5-7 grams, it’s probably not very healthy to keep it.  Toss it or donate it.  Once the pantry is clean, you can start FRESH, stocking your kitchen with a variety of healthy foods that will not only lower your glucose, but also provide a wide variety of essential nutrients for your body’s healing.

Now it’s time to make a meal plan; starting with simple vegetables and meats is best and easiest. It typically takes about 20-30 minutes to prepare/cook most low carb meals, but many newbies find it difficult to see that.  They imagine all sorts of complex recipes with foreign ingredients and spending hours in the kitchen.  If you develop a meal plan for a week or 2 at a time, you can make your shopping list accordingly and save hundreds of dollars a year by buying only what you need for known meals.

Staples for your low carb kitchen:

Your favorite spices are usually fine, but avoid combos or read labels carefully; many combos include casein (milk) or wheat (anti-caking agent) and a variety of “natural” flavors which often include sugars. Pink Himalayan salt is my favorite salt as it supposedly contains trace minerals we need.  We eat a lot of black pepper, garlic, and onion powders, so these are vital for our kitchen.  You find the spices that make you happy and stock those.  Salt is necessary, so don’t skimp on salt.  When cutting out all the processed foods, we’re also cutting out TONS of salts and salty preservatives – most of these chemicals we don’t need.  But sodium is required for normal muscle functions and a variety of major body processes, so don’t cut salt on LCHF – INCREASE salt intake, but only salt foods that have never been salted before.

In addition to a good quality salt, choose oils based on this chart: Olive, avocado oils are good, but heating them for certain cooking processes isn’t the best choice.  I use butter or refined coconut oil (no coconut flavor) for high-heat searing of most meat.  I cook most of my veggies in butter and/or bacon grease.

how to use oils photo

Avoid margarine period. It was invented to make turkeys/poultry fatter faster; what do you think it’s doing to US? Never buy “low-fat” or “lite” foods.  Always purchase full-fat products as these contain the fewest sugars and best fats.

Nut flours like almond or coconut can be used in small quantities, on occasion, but I teach patients to avoid using these for at least 30 days on LCHF eating. Subbing these ingredients out for wheat flour to make a pan of brownies is defeating your REAL purpose in making these changes and prevents your palate from resetting.  Giving in to sugar cravings by making a low carb sweet can continue the cravings and make your body more confused.  Teaching your body to do what YOU want is more important than satisfying a “sweet tooth.”  After glucose is under control or once weight is lost and you’re happier with your health, it is usually safe to try some of the low carb breads, pizzas, and desserts – but I always caution people to NOT expect it to taste or feel like “it used to.”  The consistency, flavor, and texture will be different.

Sweeteners are not typically recommended on LCHF eating because they often trigger the same exact response in the liver and pancreas as sugar; again, I typically recommend avoiding any type of sweetener for 30 days – 30 days won’t kill ya! Once you’re past the 30 days and/or glucose levels/weight are down, you can test sweeteners to see how your body responds. Test glucose prior to consuming a sweetener of choice and test again an hour or 2 afterwards.  Testing is the only way to know for certain how a food or ingredient impacts your glucose. Once you’re past the first 30 days and are looking for more variety in your recipes, you can try erythritol, a sugar alcohol that is poorly absorbed and less likely to cause glucose spikes – but TEST to know for sure!

Find or make a low carb mayo; most commercial mayonnaise contains sugars, corn syrup or other sweeteners. If you can find a low carb mayo in the store, that’s AWESOME! Many of us make our own, but since we can’t have breads, making mayo becomes a very rare occasion.  I make it 3-4 times a year when I want tuna or chicken salad.  Full-fat sour cream can sometimes be used in place of mayo or yogurt in recipes.

Image result for mayonnaise nutrition information
This label is a great example of how sneaky companies are; notice ZERO carbs, but SUGAR is listed as an ingredient!

 

Heavy cream is preferred over milk when eating LCHF; all milks contain sugars, but cream contains barely any sugar at all because it is the fat that is removed from milk at the dairy. Yes, it’s heavy whipping cream, found in cardboard milk containers most often.  You can use it to make gravies, sauces, toppings, etc. for a wide variety of LCHF recipes.

If you can afford it, buy grass-fed butter, dairy and meat products. Find a local farmer to buy from. Google a dairy nearby.  The closer our food products are to the farm, the less likely that additives, hormones, and antibiotics are tainting our foods.

Healthy cheeses include the ones with the least amount of chemicals/additives listed in ingredients; avoid processed cheese like Velveeta, cheese slices, and cheese sticks. Use full fat cheeses whenever possible. Some people do find that dairy products can trigger inflammation, bloating, swelling, and glucose/insulin spikes and must limit or avoid them altogether.

Meats and Veggies

When shopping for meats, choose the cheaper cuts as these also contain the most fats; saturated animal fats have never been shown to be unhealthy. We just believed people when they said they were.  Purchase the 70%/30% ground beef products or the closest possible.  Buy the steaks with the most marbling.  Buy roasts with thick layers of fat on them. When shopping for lunch or deli meats, really be “on your toes” with regard to ingredients; most ham is smoked in brown sugar or honey.  Many lunchmeats have corn syrup added to them during processing.  Pepperoni, salami, pork rinds, and summer sausage usually have little to no sugars/carbs.

All meats are approved for LCHF eating: beef, deer, moose, caribou, elk, pork, chicken, turkey, lamb, duck, fish, seafood, etc.  Consideration must be taken into account for processed meats; since companies are seasoning and prepping the meat, always read nutrition and ingredient labels.  There are over 60 names for sugar or natural sweeteners; companies are learning to “hide” sugar by using more “natural” or healthy-sounding words.  Be aware.  Read and do your research.  We often find “side meat” and cook it like bacon; it is often found in a meat deli or butcher shop and is fresh, not cured, not soaked in chemical preservatives.  Many people equate LCHF eating to the old “Atkins diet” and believe we low-carb-ers also eat high amounts of protein/meat.  But that is not the case; Dr. Atkins was on to something with his low carb diet plan, but he missed the mark just a bit with his philosophy on proteins.  The “missing link” that I believe he omitted was that excess protein, in the absence of carbohydrates, will be converted into glucose.  LCHF is not a “meat free-for-all” but rather, it is keeping meat portions very small to help minimize gluconeogenesis – converting protein into glucose.  In general, keeping protein intake to about 15-20% of daily intake is ideal; athletes will need more protein than sedentary people, so keep in mind your personal life when calculating dietary intake of your macronutrients.  To calculate your protein needs, identify your ideal body weight or lean body mass – this weight can be found in a variety of online calculators published and determined by insurance companies.  Convert this weight into kilograms (kg) by dividing your weight in pounds by 2.2.  Then multiply this number by 0.8 – 1.6, as this is the range of needed protein per kg per day.  EXAMPLE:   A 40-year-old female office worker weighs 175 lbs; her ideal body weight/lean body mass, based on her height of 5’6” is approx. 140 lbs.  Divide 140 lbs/2.2 = 64 kg is her weight in kilograms. Multiply 64 kg x 0.8 kg of protein per day = 51.2 grams of protein is ideal for this particular lady.

Vegetables are often confusing to people, since so many GRAINS are also called veggies by restaurants and even in diet literature. AVOID all grains: corn, rice, and quinoa.  Avoid root vegetables most of the time; root vegetables include potatoes, turnips, onions, carrots, and any other starchy vegetables.  Using a few slivers of a carrot atop a salad isn’t a terrible choice, but having 1 small serving of “penny carrots” could result in elevated glucose for a week! You may also use onions for seasonings or toppings, but keep your portion of it to a tiny “garnish” type of amount.  Recommended vegetables include:  alfalfa sprouts, arugula, asparagus, bamboo, bok choy, broccoli, broccoli sprouts, Brussel sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, chard, chives, cucumber, celery, eggplant, jalapeno, kohlrabi, kale, kelp, lettuce, mushrooms, mustard greens, okra, parsley, pickles (sugar-free), radicchio, rutabaga, salad greens, snow peas, spinach, string (green) beans, sweet (colored) peppers, zucchini.  Keep serving to about 2/3 cup per meal for best results.  Add fats to all servings.

As for squash, zucchini is pretty low carb, but many of the other squashes are higher in carbs, so if you choose to have a winter squash, be prepared to see some rise in glucose levels; some people can tolerate more of these foods than others. Individualize your meals based on your meter readings. Tomatoes and artichokes also fall into this “gray” area of choices.  They may impact some glucose levels with a minimal response, while shooting other glucose levels through the roof.  Base your food choices on your glucose readings; over time, your body will teach you what is safe for you.

Sample meals:

Breakfast – Eggs and bacon

When I first began eating LCHF, I would usually have 2-3 eggs and 2-3 slices of bacon every morning in addition to my fatty coffee, also known as bulletproof coffee(BPC). Over several weeks, I found I couldn’t eat that much on a regular basis; I’m now eating 1 slice of bacon and 1 egg with my BPC. This decrease is a normal reduction of intake when eating LCHF; as time progresses, we often find that we eat less quantity as well as less often.  Eating 5-6 small meals per day has become the “norm” for most of us for a couple reasons.  First, we’ve been told to do so by our nutritionists, dieticians, and health care providers; secondly, when eating high carb, the carbs are used or stored within minutes, making us feel hungry again triggering need for repeated meals.  Once our bodies adapt to burning fats instead of carbs, we no longer feel hungry as often; fats provide a much longer period of satisfaction, curbing hunger and urges to snack all the time.  When I have BPC, 1 egg and 1 slice of bacon in the morning, I usually don’t feel hunger again until 3-4 pm, meaning I can skip lunch without feeling deprived or hungry.  I don’t feel the urge to snack or eat because my brain is being fueled by ketones that are broken down from the fats I’ve eaten.  Sometimes, I do make a low-carb pancake breakfast, or make egg muffins with cheese and meat – no flour.  Walden Farms actually makes a sugar-free syrup that some people are able to use without significant glucose spikes.  There are now hundreds of low-carb recipes to satisfy any “hankering” you may have when you just want something different from eggs and bacon.  However, I LOVE eggs and bacon!!  If I’m in a hurry, I will sometimes have a small chunk of cheddar cheese with a boiled egg – easy and fast for those “on-the-go” days. But NO toast!

Meal Ideas

Some of our favorite entrees are provided below; most meats can be seared on high heat in refined coconut oil in about 20 minutes or less. Toss some veggies in a skillet of bacon grease or butter and they are done in about the same time.  Quick, simple, and very healthy.  We often cook extra so that we have “ready-to-eat” meals on hand for busy days.   Sometimes we make a pasta-less lasagna or ziti, freezing portions of it for later use.  Some people will make cloud bread for use as buns for burgers; some people will use zucchini for “noodles” – we call them “zoodles”.  Eating LCHF is fun and exciting for multiple reasons, including experimenting with new and different foods, spices, etc.  But most of all, it’s exciting to see glucose control, weight loss, and improved health overall.

Taco-less Salad

3 oz browned hamburger meat, seasoned with NO sugars, chilis, garlic, onion/chili powder – your favorites

2-3 oz shredded cheese – your favorite

1 Tablespoon finely chopped onions

½ of a sliced avocado

1-2 tablespoons of regular sour cream

2 halved or quartered grape tomatoes

About 1 cup salad greens (the more colorful, the more nutrients)

Sugar-free (preferably homemade) salsa

Hamburger Steak with Asparagus

Brown 3-4 oz hamburger patties in butter or bacon grease; season to taste; use highest fat content meat

Chop asparagus into 2” pieces – you can season them and roast them in oven on 400 degrees for 20 min/stirring halfway through, OR you can stir-fry in butter/bacon grease on stovetop for about 12 -15 minutes. In fact, any vegetable can be prepared using this method.

Breadless Sandwiches

Take 2 slices of sugar-free lunch/deli meat and cover with a thin layer of full-fat cream cheese

Add veggie pieces (your faves) or sliced cheese

You can roll these up OR add more meat for a flat, more normal-looking sandwich.

Place 2 more slices of lunch meat on top and cook in buttered skillet for 5-8 minutes or just until cream cheese melts and meat begins to brown. Cut into triangles and serve with veggie of your choice.  Can dip into home-made dressing or mayo, olive/avocado oil.

Here at KetoNurses, we truly hope you benefit from our information and that this article offers you a solid foundation for your new “keto” lifestyle! Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook!

The Chaos Within

 

In the last article, we discussed the 3 processes that the body uses to metabolize, utilize, and store glucose. In this article, we will discuss several conditions that occur when those processes become overwhelmed and organs are unable to keep up with their usual functions.

First of all, if you haven’t read my “peas and cornbread” article, you should. It’s the primer for this more complex article; without understanding it, this article may become difficult to understand.  You can check it out here.  https://ketonurses.wordpress.com/2017/03/16/how-did-i-get-fat-how-did-i-get-diabetes-how-did-i-get-so-unhealthy/

If you’ll recall, the blood stream only requires about 4 grams of glucose for 24 hours of normal daily functions and processes. Four grams is the equivalent to 1 teaspoon.  You read that correctly… 1 teaspoon of sugar is all the body requires to maintain body systems every day.  That is a tiny amount of sugar! Compare that to a day’s worth of intake suggested and recommended by nutritionists, medical providers, and respected non-profit organizations world-wide; most “experts” recommend 45 – 60 grams of carbs per meal (45 x 3 = 135; 60 x 3 = 180) and at least 15 grams per snack twice daily (another 30 grams).  The American Heart and Diabetes Associations are highly regarded as experts in guideline recommendations, but how in the world did they come to THIS conclusion?  A human needs 4 grams of glucose, yet we have been told for 50 years to consume approx. 200+ grams daily to maintain health.  What happens to all the excess?

The excess carbohydrate intake results in a variety of medical diagnoses, but all have one specific problem – insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the cause of type 2 diabetes (DM2), hypertension, many types of infertility, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), hypertriglyceridemia, various hormone imbalances, a variety of migraines, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD), Alzheimer’s, coronary heart disease, and many other conditions.  We will discuss here how all of this chaos occurs within.

The human body was designed with multiple back-up systems and methods for overcoming a variety of stressors, including poor nutrition. Looking back over history, we can see periods of great famine where food was extremely scarce, yet people survived.  The human race has not gone extinct; our bodies and our organs were designed and well-prepared to face a variety of environmental & nutritional struggles.  Yet, we may have found one obstacle we cannot overcome:  ourselves.

After reviewing the “peas & cornbread” article, you will see that our bodies have 3 different processes for metabolizing glucose from the carbohydrates we consume. If any of these processes become overwhelmed, another process will be triggered and more glucose is removed from the bloodstream another way.  However, if all 3 processes are too busy and struggle to keep up, the human system gets sick.  Have you ever known a basement to flood? Did you see a sump pump trying to remove the water from the house? If the rain/flood waters are coming in faster than the pump can remove it, what happens?  The flood continues to rise; more damage is done to the home.  So it is with overconsumed carbohydrates over time.  As high carb intake continues, the pancreas, bloodstream, and liver work overtime trying to remove all the excess glucose.  After months or years, the system cannot keep up; organs never get to rest, even during sleep.  These overactive processes often contribute to insomnia, which increases body stress, raising glucose even more; it becomes a downward spiral to poor health.

Many patients, when told of their new diagnosis, often say, “but I don’t feel sick.” And it’s very true.  The human body is SO GOOD at managing our internal chemistry, the system can become very imbalanced before any symptoms are noticed; some symptoms are subtle and just disregarded.  Fatigue, or feeling tired, is often overlooked or ascribed to our busy lifestyles; gaining weight is often attributed to our genes, our lack of exercise, or even to poor nutrition.  Forgetfulness is usually attributed to being distracted or just part of normal aging; muscle aches & joint pains are often called fibromyalgia or arthritis.  Sugar cravings are seen as the body’s way of getting us to eat something we “need.” Feeling hungry all the time is often seen as poor thyroid function or just staying too busy to eat.  I could go on and on with the vague symptoms people report to medical providers during office visits; most of these symptoms are ignored or regarded as “not pertinent” to today’s problem-oriented office visit.  Millions of patients world-wide report these types of symptoms on a daily basis, and then when they are finally confronted with a life-altering diagnosis, most seem utterly shocked and surprised.  It truly is a shame; I see it regularly and wish I could do something more to help.  People do not seem to understand how they could possibly be diabetic or infertile, or have NAFLD when they’ve been eating according to nutrition guidelines for many years, with only occasional “cheats” or unhealthy foods.  They come in and complain that no provider ever told them this or that; they report many years of struggling with food addictions and cravings.  They even bring brochures and eating plans from other providers and nutritionists, saying, “I eat exactly according to this plan; how can I now have diabetes?”

It all begins with overworking our human systems; while the body is amazing at maintaining the appearance of health, our organs are often taking the brunt of the illness. Every carbohydrate we consume converts into glucose and/or fructose, triggering the pancreas to secrete insulin so that the excess sugars can be removed from the bloodstream because they do not belong there.  Over time, the pancreas either cannot keep up and is unable to secrete enough insulin, or it begins to make faulty insulin – insulin that is no longer functioning to move glucose out of the bloodstream.  This one organ, the pancreas, can become very ill, resulting in pancreatitis.  Difficult to heal, it can take many months or years for the pancreas to recover, and if carbs continue to be consumed in high quantities, it will never recover.

Another problem that develops with these high carb intakes is the body’s cells become resistant to the insulin; there’s so much glucose in the bloodstream, that there’s just not enough insulin to transport the glucose out of the bloodstream. Think about magnets for a moment – recall that magnets are polar.  One end of a magnet will be attracted to another, but the other end repels the other magnet.  Glucose and insulin can become that way in the bloodstream when there are too many glucose molecules in the blood.  If glucose repels insulin (or vice versa), glucose accumulates in the bloodstream instead of being moved into cells. This overload of glucose can contribute to thick, sticky blood which significantly contributes to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD), Alzheimer’s, coronary heart disease, heart attacks, strokes, and many other conditions.  Imagine a family of beavers locating to a new stream.  Dad Beaver scouts out a great location and begins bringing limbs and moss to build a new home for his family.  Mom and kids soon begin to help out; at first, water flows easily through the creek.  As more limbs and debris are placed, water flow slows.  Although water is flowing, animals and plants downstream begin to feel the effects of less water.  Finally, after some time, the Beaver family stands proudly inside their new home, where no water is able to get through.  All the plants and animals downstream suffer.  So is the circulatory system within our bodies.  Capillaries are the tiniest blood vessels we have; it is through capillary walls that blood delivers oxygen and picks up wastes like carbon dioxide to be transported to kidneys and lungs for excretion. These capillaries are so tiny that they can only allow for 1 tiny red blood cell to get through at a time.  Take a look at this picture; the largest circle is of a human hair, greatly enlarged.  The darkest circle is the diameter of a red blood cell.  Can you see the image of the beaver dam happening inside blood vessels now?

MicronIllustration

Image from: http://www.baldwinfilter.com/fr/TechTips201403.html, Retrieved 4/3/17.

Now, let’s add to this imagery. Think about the beavers building their dam; are they using trimmed up logs that are nice and smooth – like those with which we might build a log cabin?  No, of course not.  The beavers are using limbs and debris from all over the riverbanks.  Crooked and jagged limbs stick together better and are easier for the beavers to use.  The jagged pieces literally intertwine and stick together even with waters moving through during early building stages.  This image is of a sugar molecule:

sugar-molecule-1

Image from: https://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/candy/sugar.html, retrieved 4/3/17.

Notice how jagged and crooked this molecule is. Even when broken down into glucose and fructose, the molecule remains jagged and easy to snag on other molecules.  It’s not smooth like blood cells.  Now, imagine hundreds upon thousands of these molecules overfilling blood vessels that are tiny, tiny, tiny.  Can you see how circulation becomes terribly impaired, just as when a beaver dam is constructed in a creek?  Can you imagine all these sticky, syrup-like molecules just sticking together and building up tiny little beaver dams all throughout blood vessels?  This process, reducing blood flow, is what typically results in heart attacks, strokes, and amputations in people with diabetes and insulin resistance.  When blood flow cannot reach the target, tissues are deprived of oxygen and nutrients, resulting in beaver dams or microscopic clots in blood vessels.  Without oxygen and other nutrients, tissues cannot function properly, nerve tissue ceases to respond to stimuli, and sensation and use are impaired.  When enough blood vessels are blocked, tissue is damaged, like with diabetic neuropathy or chronic kidney damage.

In other tissues, this overflow of sticky blood and poor insulin activity also contributes to a myriad of problems. High insulin in the bloodstream triggers many hormone abnormalities.  The normal chemical balance in the human body is fragile; anytime one chemical drops low or jumps up high, a wide variety of abnormal processes may begin.  In women, one of the most common chemical imbalances results in abnormal reproductive hormones that usually regulate our monthly cycles and fertility. One of the pathways suggested for this imbalance goes something like this:  being overweight and/or insulin resistant contributes to hyperinsulinemia (high insulin in blood).  Having too much insulin, the bloodstream sends signals to the liver (remember the “peas & cornbread” story) and this effect signals a decrease in growth factor production/release which increases androgen activity; increased androgen activity causes an increase in estrogen and luteinizing hormone (LH).  Increases in estrogen and LH levels stimulate ovarian hyperplasia – or the overgrowth of tissue – which can result in endometriosis or polycystic ovaries.  Ovarian hyperplasia, overstimulation of ovaries and the increased levels of reproductive hormones all combine to cause anovulation, or ovaries that are not releasing eggs for possible fertilization; thus, infertility occurs.

In the liver the high levels of insulin, glucose, and associated inflammatory processes combine to trigger storage of glucose in the form of glycogen; once the liver has stored all it can hold and blood sugars remain high, the liver doesn’t know what to do with all the excess carbohydrate being ingested. It just keeps storing more and more.  Let’s imagine that you decide to put your household garbage in the pantry, instead of taking it outside to the trash bin for collection.  Keep doing this.  Every time you fill a garbage bag, you pull it out of the can, tie it up, and pile bag after bag in the pantry; then you run out of room, and begin filling kitchen cabinets.  Eventually, those cabinets fill as well; so where do you store it now?  Over time, the garbage comes to overwhelm the entire kitchen, so much so, that normal function in the kitchen is halted.  There is literally nowhere to work or accomplish cooking tasks.  That’s what happens in our livers with glycogen storage.  There’s room for a little glycogen, so in times of famine, the liver can release a few grams of glucose the body needs, but there’s not room for 200-300 grams of carbs per day for a lifetime.  This overwhelming storage of glycogen is what usually triggers non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.  (Alcohol can trigger similar, but that’s another whole story.)

In the brain, there’s a massive circulatory system used to control all our normal functions without us ever thinking. Parts of the brain control and manage our thirst, hunger, heartbeat, breathing, even most of our movements aren’t really conscious thoughts.  But now think back to the beaver dam analogy from before; most people with diabetes understand their neuropathy, or nerve pain, in their feet are caused by their high sugar levels because our feet are further away from the heart than our hands.  However, gravity can also influence blood flow somewhat; combining the physics of gravity and thick, sticky blood, the brain also suffers in a similar way.  Because the tiniest blood vessels in the brain are highly specialized to deliver certain neurotransmitters, hormones, and other chemicals to our brains (& control their release from other organs), anything that reduces blood flow in our bodies can also reduce blood flow, oxygen, and vital nutrients to the brain and associated organs. When blood flow is reduced to our brains, areas of the brain cannot adequately signal the nervous system to function properly; organs may be signaled to alter, stop, or begin a process that may become seriously damaging to health.  This reduction in blood flow to the brain is often called “microvascular ischemic changes” on a CT scan or MRI report.  In fact, many providers will see this on an otherwise normal imaging report, and never mention it to patients because it seems like such a minor problem.  However, given time and continued high carb intake, these tiny problems become bigger problems.  While most of the general population do attribute forgetfulness to “normal aging”, there’s nothing normal about it.  Aging does NOT in and of itself contribute to confusion or minor forgetfulness.  It is always worth an office visit for evaluation and workup at any age.  In 2008, The Journal of Diabetes Science & Technology published an article calling Alzheimer’s disease (AD), diabetes type 3 because “we conclude that the term “type 3 diabetes” accurately reflects the fact that AD represents a form of diabetes that selectively involves the brain and has molecular and biochemical features that overlap with both type 1 diabetes mellitus and T2DM.” (Retrieved 4/3/17 from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2769828/)

Even when none of these more serious health conditions are diagnosed, many of us do have these changes occurring inside; hypertension has been called “the silent killer” for many years, but I call insulin resistance the REAL silent killer as many chemical imbalances occur with minimal notice for most people. And mainstream medical providers typically never address root causes of many of these vague symptoms because there’s just not time in most office visits to address them and sometimes, it takes a lot of time & multiple diagnostic tests to identify certain problems.  Mild symptoms of hyperinsulinemia can contribute to high inflammatory markers in the bloodstream and if blood tests are not performed, there’s no way to know if inflammation or hyperinsulinemia contributes to your migraine headaches, your fatigue, or your fibromyalgia.  Many of us suffer with osteoarthritis, or general joint pains related to overuse or previous injury.  High carb diets can contribute to much of the joint pain because of high inflammation within the body; without a blood test and/or radiology to confirm it, many health care providers call it OA and tell you to take some OTC pain relievers.

So, now what? What does all of this physiology mean?  It means that we as a people have become terribly unhealthy because of the poor quality of fake foods we have eaten for the past 50 years.  We’ve followed the AHA and the ADA; we heeded the dietary advice; there’s recent research to prove it.  So, continuing to follow that advice certainly won’t improve our health.  What do YOU think would help?  After reading this article, I hope you say, “cut the crap.” Literally, that is the best advice ever.  Cut out all processed foods, carbonated drinks, artificial foods, fake foods, junk foods, refined sugars, and anything that even looks like it was manufactured in a plant.  Eat real food.  Eat from the farm.  Eat from the edge of the grocery store.  Think back in history; what did people eat before boxes of cereal lined the store shelves?

It’s time we the people took charge of our own health; the health care system is broken. We wait months sometimes to see health care providers who don’t have time for thorough medication reviews and physicals.  As consumers, we can change the face of nutrition in our homes, families, and our nation by making better choices and eating foods that heal our bodies.  In our next article, we’ll cover more details about what to eat and what to avoid eating.

How did I get fat? How did I get diabetes?  How did I get so unhealthy?

My daddy used to love my mama’s peas and cornbread, but watching him eat them was quite fun. Mama usually prepared his plate and took it to his recliner, where he ate on a TV tray while watching the news. Inevitably, he would finish off his cornbread first and still have peas on his plate. Well, being a faithful member of the “clean your plate club,” he figured he HAD to have another piece of cornbread to go with those peas. Then, he’d run out of peas, but still had cornbread, so he got more peas. This crazy process went on for 3-4 trips back to the kitchen until he could finish his plate evenly.  By now, you’re probably thinking 2 things for sure: 1)My daddy was a bit silly 2) Why the heck is this story here on the KetoNurses’ blog?


Well, to answer the first question, yes, my daddy could be quite the prankster and his antics brought much laughter to our lives over the years. His story of “peas & cornbread” illustrates a very valuable lesson for us. Today, we’re going to discuss cravings in the context of how the liver processes the carbohydrates we overconsume. Let’s first take a look at normal glucose-related processes in simple terms.  

SIMPLE VERSION: When healthy people eat carbohydrates, the pancreas secretes insulin to immediately control the amount of glucose entering the bloodstream. The bloodstream only needs about 4 teaspoons of glucose in a 24 hour period; what happens when we consume carbs that convert into 10-15 teaspoons of glucose? Insulin from the pancreas comes to the rescue and immediately latches on to glucose molecules entering the bloodstream from the digestive tract, then trucks it into cells. Moving glucose out of the bloodstream is vital to maintain internal chemical balance, but storing all the extra carbs is quite a feat. There is only so much insulin to go around, so another process is triggered. Overconsumed carbs trigger the liver to store some of the glucose as glycogen. Glycogen is like having a reserve gas tank on your car; if your main tank runs low/out, the car will automatically start pulling fuel from the reserve tank and so it is with glycogen. But there is only so much storage space in muscles and liver for glycogen. Glycogen is the most available form of stored energy, but it’s in pretty small quantities in the muscles, and the glycogen stored in the liver is meant for more long-term, “survival of the species” type of storage. The liver doesn’t WANT to give up the stores of glycogen, just in case it’s needed for a period of famine – our bodies are pretty good at self-preservation.  

Glucose is rapidly removed from the bloodstream in normal and mildly abnormal metabolism. Remember the last time you were hungry and ate an apple? You likely noted hunger about 20-30 minutes later, because the energy it provided was quickly used and stored. Glucose enters the digestive system and is easily passed into the bloodstream rather quickly; so there’s instant energy available, and there’s stored energy, but there doesn’t remain much glucose available for right AFTER eating. It seems there’s a “gap” in this system of fuel processing. Glucose was never meant for steady energy for all body processes; it literally was intended to be a quick way to have energy.  

So, what happens to the extra glucose molecules still causing elevated glucose? If neither of these processes cannot adequately move glucose out of the bloodstream, the liver begins to knit together chains of triglycerides – a form of cholesterol that is like having a 55 gallon drum of gas in your yard for fuel when the main AND reserve gas tanks run low. It’s easy to pull up in your own yard and fill up. So the liver is storing your extra glucose for later use. This process can take up to 4 days to complete the process. However, if we continue consuming large amounts of carbs at every meal, the liver never gets a chance to rest.


These 3 processes are the major methods for glucose storage in a normal person without diabetes or insulin resistance. When excess glucose is continually forced into this system, there is never a chance for “catching up.” The liver is constantly trying to move excess glucose out of the bloodstream while insulin is secreted by the pancreas in larger and larger amounts; more fat cells receive some of the glucose, causing weight gain. Eventually, the system begins to fail, resulting in insulin that no longer moves glucose out of the bloodstream effectively. The liver is overflowing with glycogen & becomes stressed from making triglycerides, and now, triglycerides are accumulating in blood vessels. The liver does not have a brain to tell it to STOP storing all that glycogen; when this process is overwhelmed, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease develops, the liver enlarges, and liver enzymes often increase.

When these processes are overwhelmed, we can also become insulin resistant and diabetic– meaning the insulin that the pancreas secretes just isn’t responding normally, so the pancreas tries to make more and more, but it’s just not effective at moving enough glucose out of the bloodstream. An analogy that I sometimes use with patients helps people understand; imagine you are employed on a production line in a manufacturing plant. You get paid based on your production. Everything is going along quite well with your organized and efficient workflow; you work and you make 100% production every day and take home a paycheck with which you’re happy. Suddenly, your boss comes along and says you must double production or be fired. What happens to your nice, organized workflow? You are working faster and faster, getting more nervous, even becoming frantic that you will lose your job if you can’t keep up. So you work harder and faster. What happens to the items you’re producing? Are you able to produce the same amount of high quality products moving this fast? No, of course not. And your organs are highly specialized to perform certain functions efficiently and without our thought or effort; but when we put demands on those organs and ask them to double or triple production, they cannot efficiently perform their usual functions.  

Let’s review the third process of glucose storage for a moment. Ingredients for triglycerides include sugars like glucose and fructose. When excess sugars are not needed for current energy use, these molecules thicken blood from a watery consistency to more like that of syrup, while the liver is knitting together some sugars into long chains of triglycerides. Triglyceride production can sometimes trigger cravings for food in order to ensure the liver’s ability to production. It’s like my daddy’s “peas & cornbread.” The body is trying its best to keep up, but it wants more and more glucose to process – I know it sounds contradictory; you’d think that if there was excess, the body wouldn’t want more. But once the process is triggered, the liver is just following procedure. Now, the liver is producing thick, sticky chains of triglycerides and sending them out into thick syrupy blood, contributing to a “perfect storm” inside the tiny blood vessels. It’s like building a beaver dam right inside our arteries! These sugars accumulate in the blood vessels and they are sticky – imagine if you will, drying syrup. If you leave a drop of syrup on a table or plate for a few hours, what happens? The syrup begins to dry and the sugars left begin to crystalize and harden. This imagery can help us understand what sticky, spiked molecules of triglycerides might resemble under a microscope. Now imagine these clumps of sticky molecules moving through tiny, forked, meandering blood vessels all over our bodies. Does this picture in your mind help you see where many complications from diabetes originate? Thick, sticky blood congregating in tiny vessels can slow or even halt blood flow. Slow wound healing, nerve pain, visual difficulties, numbness and tingling in hands/feet, kidney damage, heart attacks & strokes are the direct result of the formation of tiny beaver dams all over the blood stream.  

Although my daddy’s peas and cornbread are high carbohydrate foods and his story is a bit silly, I think the analogy they provide is quite helpful at understanding some fairly complex concepts. I hope this information is helpful to you; please feel free to share our articles on your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other social media accounts. We appreciate it!

 

 

Bac’n Brussel Sprouts

16 oz washed and quartered Brussel sprouts

6-8 slices of bacon

3-4 Tbsp butter

Salt, pepper, & garlic to taste


In skillet, fry bacon until to your liking. I like my bacon really crispy. Remove cooked bacon from pan and allow to cool for a few minutes. Add butter to bacon grease in pan. Add hopped Brussel sprouts to grease & butter. Sprinkle with seasonings to your preference. 
Stir fry for about 12-15 minutes or until largest sprouts are softening. Smaller pieces will appear quite soft and pierce easily. You want a good mixture of soft to barely soft. With about 2-3 minutes left, add in broken bacon pieces and keep stirring until done. 
Serve immediately. 
This dish can be made using smaller or larger quantities, depending on size of your family or event. It even keeps well; I take it for lunch often!  

Biblical Thoughts on Eating  


From today’s First Five Bible study: “A life without leadership can cause us to worship something or someone other than God. We were created with a desire to worship, and it was God’s plan for us to worship Him. The Danites stole Micah’s idols and carried them to the new land.” 

Reading through today’s study was quite eye-opening in regard to food. With so many beautiful foods out there and so many different “experts” encouraging different diets and food concepts, it is nearly impossible to know who is right and what diet rules to really follow. 

However, God provided some great tips, if we will just acknowledge them. 1. He gave Adam & Eve dominion over the animals, & so they could eat or use them as needed for clothing (after the fall). 2. He also gave them the Garden of Eden, full of beautiful vegetables & fruits. 3. He set forth dietary guidelines in Deuteronomy & Leviticus. 4. He also set forth instructions for sacrificing the fat portion – the best portion for Himself. (See Lev. 3) 5. He accepted Abel’s offering of the animal sacrifice, but He couldn’t accept Cain’s offering of grains from the field. 

Looking at these 5 facts together and not in isolation, we can see a bigger picture. We can see that God intended, from the beginning, for us to eat meat, as He’d created us with that in mind. Since we are no longer living in Old Testament times, we no longer have to offer God the best portion of the meat as sacrifice. Meat contains the most nutrient density of any food available to us. Rich in iron, vitamin B12, protein & healthy fats, red meat can provide the human body with many components for tissue healing, repair, & continued cell division for health. 

Going back to Cain’s offering – why could God not accept an offering of grains? They had been planted, tended, & harvested with great effort by Cain. He harvested the best of the crop and wanted to show God what his effort had produced. Why did God refuse this offering? I believe there’s 3 major reasons: 1. Rules of sacrifice had already been set by God and obedience to His will is required. 2. Cain was prideful in his offering; Cain wanted to show God what He’d done – that’s not the purpose of worship or sacrifice. 3. Sacrifice required the shedding of blood to atone for sin. 

Take all of this information and look at it from God’s perspective. Although we no longer live under the law, we can see that He set forth great tips in our early history. We can see His holiness and His authority remain. We can see that He created amazing nutrition for our bodies. 

We can also review modern history and see how we’ve defiled the gift of food that He provided. We’ve “chemicaled” and altered seeds, growing processes, and manufacturing methods to create food-like items that provide no nutritional value to our bodies. To what end? 

The results of all this processing and our busy lives has contributed to “the perfect storm” of disease. We’ve created our own consequences of obesity, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, arthritis and more. 

Learning that God provided us with terrific foods and great nutrition can be so freeing! We can go back to the farm for our foods! We can eat meat, fats & vegetables without fear! We can eat healthy animal fats without risk of heart disease – why would God give us a terrible, unhealthy way to eat that He knew would cause disease? He would NOT do so! 

Humans have taken ideas about food and misconstrued and lied about them. “Experts” with strong voices & lots of money took opportunity for fame with their ideas – but we’re finding out 50 years later that they were WRONG and had no scientific evidence to boot. Yes, you read that correctly! Our low-fat diet guidelines are based on hypothesis & conjecture – NOT science or research. 

So what do we do? I suggest that we go back to the farm for most of our foods. Eat plenty of vegetables and meats. Cut out grains like wheat, corn, rice, oats, barley, & rye as these trigger significant inflammatory responses in our bodies. Cut out processed oils like vegetable, corn, canola oils as these are also highly inflammatory and raise triglyceride levels. 

(Thanks to @FructoseNo for the cool photo.) 

The first question patients ask when they hear this advice is, what about cholesterol? Remember, diet guidelines were based on thoughts, NOT science; therefore, no scientific evidence has confirmed links to high cholesterol & fat intake. In fact, studies confirm the exact opposite. Higher fat intakes in multiple studies have shown lower rates of obesity and heart disease. Cholesterol is required and even made by our bodies for all sorts of processes, including hormone function, balanced brain chemistry, and tissue healing/repair. 

In summary, God made a delicious and nutritious way for us to eat. If we listen to His leadership and heed His guidance, we can actually heal our bodies and reverse many health conditions! 

25 Top Tips to Eat Healthy & Honor God with Our Lifestyle (Part 2 of 2)

Now that we know God has a better plan for our health, how do we find it? What do we do now? How do we get healthier? 

1.  Start wherever you are. Making small changes over several weeks can add up to MAJOR health benefits. Some people can go “cold turkey,” cutting out all grains & sugars, but many of us just cannot do that. So, take baby steps. One change today, another change in a few days, & on we go to a healthier life. 

2.  CHOOSE to ADD a healthier food to your life. AND Pick something you are willing to cut out and cut it out. Lay out a plan over the next few weeks to ADD something healthy AND cut out 1-2 unhealthy items each week. People are much more successful at accomplishing goals when written out and planned well.

3.  One of the most common changes people make is to reduce or cut soda from life. Soda is loaded with chemicals & sugars or sweeteners that trigger a lot of chemical reactions in the body; many of these chemicals & reactions have been linked to all sorts of health problems & chemical imbalance. I confess – I used to be one of those people that swore I’d NEVER stop drinking my soda. I frequently would drink 2-3 liters per day! And I hated water. But as my weight neared the 200 pound mark, I knew something HAD to change. So I switched to green tea. After many months, I was able to cut out the tea and now I drink water. Because 67% of the human body is made of water, it is extremely important to drink plenty of water every single day. The “rule of thumb” is to drink half your body weight in ounces of water daily. For example, if you weigh 200 lbs., your water needs are nearly 1 gallon – at 100 ounces per day. 

4.  Seek out people to join and support you on this journey to better health. Look for authors, groups, and friends who are also focused on similar health goals and spiritual support as yourself. Start a support group in your town, community or church. 

5. Keep your efforts positive! Don’t focus on cutting out the unhealthy items; focus on adding healthier foods. Remember that natural fats are NOT unhealthy. Add butter, coconut oil, avocado & olive oils, tree nuts, & even cheeses. 

6.  Remember that fats will keep you fuller longer than carbohydrates. Adding healthy fats to meals can help you go many hours without feeling hunger, thus reducing your intake. When I drink my fat-filled coffee, I often go 6-8 hours to my next meal, obliterating the standard “rule” to eat every 2-3 hours. 

7.  Start by reducing portion sizes. Remember that the stomach is only about the size of your fist. So, an easy method to eat less, is to cut portions in half when you prepare your plate. I teach people to eat on saucers or salad plates to help keep portion sizes down. Separate your plate of food into halves or thirds; from that division, make a “takeout” for lunch the next day or split with your spouse or meal companion. 

8. Keep meat portions small – about the size of a deck of cards. This tip is vital for people with high glucose or sugar problems. Eating large quantities of meats while cutting out carbs can trigger a process where the body will produce glucose from the excess protein, and can result in elevated glucose levels – not helpful for people with metabolism problems or diabetes. 

9. Drink a glass of water about 10 minutes before eating to help your stomach signal fullness sooner during eating. Remember that it can take up to 15 minutes for the brain to recognize fullness and tell you to stop eating. Most of us can finish off a huge plate of food in less than 10 minutes. If you finish a plate of food in under 10 minutes, wait before refilling your plate. 


10.  Use this plate as a general guide to preparing your plate. Try to decrease carbs as you increase fats – remembering that this specific tactic should be used VERY short-term. Consuming high amounts of carbs AND high amounts of fats for weeks or months st a time, may increase your risk of heart disease and a decline in health. 

11.  If you cut out carbs “cold turkey,” do your research into “carb flu” or “keto flu.” Carbohydrate conversion to glucose has caused addiction in most of us; dropping carb intake suddenly can contribute to a variety of vague symptoms that can be quite significant to normal function. Symptoms can include headache, muscle aches/cramps, feeling tired, mood swings, irritability, insomnia, and slower bowel movements. In general, these symptoms last about a week or so; some people take a few days more or less to overcome these symptoms. Being prepared with lots of salty broth, avocado, magnesium & potassium-rich foods help dramatically. I typically don’t recommend going cold turkey for most people because many folks get frustrated when symptoms seem worse right away when they’ve been told they will feel better giving up carbs. Some people just can’t seem to fight through these temporary symptoms. 

12..One of the most shocking truths that people seem to struggle with is the idea that fruits also have to be cut. Subbing out a candy bar for a banana sounds like it would be MUCH healthier, but in all reality, it’s only slightly better. Fruits have been genetically engineered to taste maximally sweet – that sugar must go somewhere – it fills the bloodstream with excess sugar that must be managed by the body.  I usually recommend at least 30 days of no fruit, sweeteners, or processed foods, once most of the carbs have been cut out. This method allows the taste buds to reset and enjoy less-sweet flavors and it helps the liver with detoxification, reducing its workload. 

13. Pay close attention to your body’s signals. Hunger is designed to alert us to the need for fuel; it should signal that it’s time to seek food by a stomach emptiness &/or growl. A clock or social event should not dictate meal times as we’ve thought in modern times. The most basic rule to go by is: if you are not physically hungry, do not eat. There is no need to put fuel in a full tank. 

14. The new buzzword today is “gluten-free.” Don’t fall for it. While I do recommend going grain-free, substituting more high-carb, processed, nutrition-less fake foods will not contribute to good health. Gluten-free foods utilize rice, potatoes, fruits & other grains to make comfort/snack foods. So, paying for high-priced food-like chemicals will not improve your nutrition status. 

15. Because we’ve become accustomed to eating low fat foods, our tendency now is to purchase similar foods and think we’re making healthier choices. When possible, make full-fat choices. Foods are either flavored with fats or sugars. Sugars are the most detrimental to our health as evidenced by elevated glucose levels after consuming them. 

16. When buying groceries, try to shop the perimeter of the store; avoid aisles of processed, boxed & bagged food items. The edges of the store typically contain the produce, meat, & dairy products – most of what is in your new lifestyle. 

17. Read labels. Look for non-food words, like preservatives, chemicals, & sugars. With 60+ terms for sugars, it can take a while to figure out how manufacturers attempt to hide sugars from us. Keeping food choices closest to the farm will help keep shopping focused – at least for the first few weeks. Frozen foods are often fine; some canned foods may be ok as well. Purchase the cheapest cuts of meats as these will contain the highest natural fat content. Just make the best possible choices within your budget. Cutting out expensive processed foods will also contribute to decreased spending! What a bonus! 

18. Record your intake. Write down everything you eat and drink. Or use an app. MyFitnessPal and Cronometer are both very popular apps for helping to keep track of intake and macros.  Finding your “sweet spot” with macronutrients can take a little time, depending on your specific health conditions, medicine use, & body chemistry. Macronutrients are proteins, fats & carbohydrates. While I typically recommend 70-80% fat, 15-25% protein, & 5% carb intake for the average person, I often individualize a plan that is very specific and based on personalized needs.

19. In addition, adjusting medication doses for patients means I also build great relationships with my patients because they come in for visits as often as every week – at least for a while. I am a firm believer in keeping communication with your provider very open; if you are cutting carbs while on medicine, many doses may need to be decreased, while some meds may need to be stopped. Even if your health care provider is NOT very supportive of low carb nutrition, they will still need to be aware of your glucose & blood pressure levels in order to make medication changes safely & accurately. 

20. I remember when I began implementing these methods of weight loss during the Bible study. For the first few days, I would go about 11-12 hours waiting for true physiological hunger to signal me to eat. For people with sugar problems & diabetes, this step should be done with the assistance of a trained healthcare provider to avoid dropping your glucose to an unhealthy level. Using both diet AND medications for sugar control can cause serious drops in your glucose level. It is very important to seek out help managing medication doses and appropriate reductions in your prescribed medicine. 

21. I also found that frequent prayer helped me focus on eating healthier. Staying in close communion with the Holy Spirit helped me be aware of eating when I wasn’t hungry or eating after I was full. I really tried to keep Proverbs 23:1-2 in my mind & heart 24/7.  

22. Find an accountability partner – in addition to the Holy Spirit. Research shows that people who change lifestyle habits succeed at much higher rates than people who go it alone. Eating is a social event, so changing your diet WITH someone is much easier than eating two different meals. Purchasing groceries for one meal plan is also much less expensive! 

23. A lot of people making lifestyle changes begin or resume taking loads of vitamins & supplements. Most are unnecessary, not helpful, poorly absorbed & pricey. I don’t typically recommend multivitamins at all any more. I usually recommend Vitamin D, as we are all pretty deficient. If you have your level tested, you can monitor your level annually to be sure you stay in the normal  range. Many cardiologists are also recommending magnesium supplements now too; for one, it’s great for heart health & it aids in the absorption of the Vitamin D. 

24. Keep a journal. Write down your thoughts and feelings as you enter this journey. Record your current symptoms and as you begin to notice relief, record that too. My hip arthritis & psoriasis disappeared after 2 weeks of cutting out the grains – totally unexpected benefit! Record methods that God uses to help you reduce intake or make healthier choices. Keep track of blessings so that difficulties are easier to bear! 

25. Lastly, do NOT wallow in guilt, fear or shame. There are loads of tips here. You do not have to make every change mentioned here. Just pick a few that seem like they would benefit you the most & start with those changes.  Come out of that darkness and into the Light. God wants us to LIVE. He wants us to LIVE a long and healthy life. He wants us to be blessed and to bless others. 

Does God care if I’m overweight or unhealthy? (Part 1 of 2)

 

Many years ago, I took part in a Bible study that focused on losing weight using several different techniques that did help me become thinner. One of the weekly studies focused on a Bible verse from Proverbs 23:
When you sit to dine with a ruler, note well what is before you, and put a knife to your throat if you are given to gluttony.

That verse struck me as quite harsh and shocking. I had never really thought about overeating or eating just to eat might be anything that bothered God or was sinful. I knew He’d set forth all sorts of dietary laws in the Pentateuch, but I never made a connection between HOW & WHAT He wanted us to eat.

So, this verse in Proverbs really rocked my world. I pondered and meditated on this verse for days. I never thought I might be a glutton! That realization was VERY hard to wrap my head around. I tried to rationalize my overeating, my emotional eating, my eating when I was bored. It seemed that everywhere I turned, I heard this verse in my head. I saw evidence that God did not want me to overeat. Various “accidents” happened; I dropped bites of food. I spilled soda. I was repeatedly shocked by the simple methods God used to decrease my food intake.

For the past 10 years, I’ve continued to utilize many of the techniques I learned in that Bible study; I’ve even taught patients to use some of them. But I’ve rarely mentioned the verse that stirred such guilt & shame in my own spirit & emotions. I was afraid. I was guilty. I was ashamed. I was shocked. It was very hard for me to recognize that God wanted me to “cut my throat” if I was going to overeat. It sounded so very harsh then and still sounds harsh today. But in the years since I first studied the verse, I’ve begun to come to terms with what I believe God tried to set forth in this verse.

img_6275First of all, I know I’m not perfect. I still sometimes overeat or make an unhealthy choice. My goal is to help people see that God knows the desire of our human nature is selfishness – even in eating – and He does not want us to feel so guilty, fearful, or ashamed. He wants us to enjoy eating. He wants us to be joyful. He wants us to LIVE. In Deuteronomy 5, Moses wrote to the Israelites, saying ” Walk in obedience to all that the LORD your God has commanded you, so that you may live and prosper and prolong your days in the land that you will possess.” (NIV, v 33).

 

Do you see that God wants us to LIVE? Living is not surviving. Living is not becoming overweight, unhealthy or unhappy. Living is being able to overcome & be victorious. Living is joyful – even during trials & tribulations, we can have inner peace & joy when we pursue LIFE. God really does WANT us to live with this idea at the heart of our being; He wants our focus on Christ and His ways so that we can LIVE a long life. Proverbs 10:7 says, “The fear of the Lord prolongs life, but the years of the wicked will be short.” God isn’t saying that life will always be shortened as punishment, but may be a result of poor choices. Scripture is full of evidence of poor choices that resulted in serious consequences. God’s desire is NOT to punish us. His desire is to bless us – over & over again. He wants to give us long, healthy lives. When we make repeated bad choices, often those choices have their own consequences by laws of nature, science, chemistry, or physics. God is not going to override natural laws to save us from ourselves. Some of these consequences include illness and shortened life.

How can we obtain God’s favor and live long healthy lives? It’s easy. We seek His will, guidance & pursue a relationship with Him. We also go back in history to learn how people ate in the past. In Biblical days, many people lived to be well over 100 years old; Moses lived to 120. Joshua died at age 110. Noah lived 950 years. How? Why? Even if years were measured differently then (they weren’t much different), Noah lived a LONG, LONG time. How? Why? Can we adopt any of the habits or culture to help us today? I believe we can.

In Genesis, God gave the Garden of Eden & livestock of the land to Adam & Eve. He gave these to Adam & Eve for their own nourishment. He provided plants and animals for eating & satisfying our need for fuel & nutrients. He wanted us to enjoy eating and so He created a variety of tasty plants.

However, modern society has taken advantage of the earth & altered methods of planting, harvesting, & processing. Many of these methods have adulterated natural foods and removed nutritional value that God intended. One of the most common ways to improve nutrition state, is to cut out most or all of the processed, highly chemical-laden foods. Most processed and prepackaged food items have almost no nutritional value. Read nutrition labels, if you’re skeptical. Compare labels of white bread and whole grain bread, for example. There is very little difference in nutrient content. If whole grains are supposed to so much healthier for us, why is there no increased nutrient density?

Looking back over time, having bread at every meal every day was not common. Breads were difficult to have in large quantities because wheat and other grains have a long growing season & require a large amount of field to grow enough for use. With poor storage methods, grains were used seasonally, not daily. The only time in history that people ate bread daily is when God provided manna from Heaven to the children of Israel. He instructed them to gather it daily except for the Sabbath because it wouldn’t keep well. That manna provided plenty of nutrients because Scripture is clear – they ate manna daily for 40 years – and the people suffered no ill health effects. Other than this specified 40 years, humans have only had breads/grains seasonally. What did they eat the rest of the year? Meat. Meat is the only food source that has always been available.

Fruits & vegetables were only available seasonally. Very few plant products were easily stored for weeks or months on end. They did not use chemical preservatives to keep foods stable on a store shelf for months at a time. They used salt and fat to preserve foods. They built in-ground cellars where temps were cooler, but food was rarely stored for more than a few months.

In summary, God intends for us to LIVE long, healthy lives. How? First, realize that He has provided a way. Next, look to nature for most food sources. Avoid eating food-like items that man has conjured up in a chemistry lab or manufacturing plant. Look to the farm – the closer a food is to nature, the higher the nutrient content. Nutrient-dense foods are from the farm/garden. Foods with the most nutrition are meats, vegetables, & natural fats. Only consume fruits as occasional treats – fruits would only have been available seasonally, not year round. Substituting fruits for unhealthy highly processed carbs may seem like a good option, but remember they still convert to fructose & glucose, and too much can still cause ill health.

Finally, does God care if we are healthy or not? Of course He cares. He wants us to be healthy. He wants a full life for each of us. He’s designed a great way for us to be healthy and live a long time. Our next blog article offers tips to do just that!

What’s all the hub-bub about low carb?

 

Over the past 50 years, nutrition advice has been a bit fluid with regards to a variety of nutrients or macronutrients. In the most recent 5-10 years, a few grass-roots experts have come forward with even more changes they recommend for our eating health.  Some physicians and authors are encouraging complete grain-free nutrition, while others advocate for a 100% plant-based diet.  Now comes along this idea to cut carbs from our diets.  Here, we will attempt to define and discuss carbohydrates, their purpose, sources, and whether or not we actually NEED those carbs.

First, let’s take a look at the 3 macronutrients: carbohydrates, proteins, & fats.  These macronutrients are the largest sources of food and nutrients for our bodies.  In the past, it was believed that 45-65% of our daily intake should be from carbohydrates, 10-35% % of our intake should come from proteins, and that 20-35% of our intake should come from fats.   Fats were touted as being minimally necessary to bodily processes, while proteins & carbs were proclaimed as more important nutrients the body needed.

Carbohydrates in high quantities were thought to be necessary because they provide instant energy for usual daily activity, body processes, and exercise. Prior to 1980, when the first dietary guidelines were published, there had been little to no scientific research published regarding these macronutrients; however, some very strong personalities with governmental and financial support were able to advocate for dietary guidelines not too different from today’s high carbohydrate recommendations.  With no supporting data and no real science to back up the 1980 nutrition recommendations, they were advertised and supported by a myriad of governmental agencies, non-profit organizations, and medical providers across the country; the media was complicit in assisting in “educating” the public on these rules, and magazines/newspapers published countless news articles encouraging the American public to reduce fat intake and significantly increase carbohydrate intake. (You can read more on this story here:  https://ketonurses.wordpress.com/2015/03/03/does-cholesterol-cause-heart-attacks-is-fat-bad-for-me/.)

Fast-forward 40 years and take a look at the devastation to our bodies by such high carb and nutrition-less food-like items we’ve been consuming. Prior to the 1980 dietary guidelines, there was little heart disease, type 2 diabetes, few strokes & heart attacks, and minimal obesity.  There were fewer cases of cancers & inflammatory conditions like arthritis and lupus.  How did people die in previous decades? Infection was the number 1 killer up until antibiotics became the mainstay of healthcare in the 1960s-80s.  Accidents and injuries were another top cause of death, but heart disease and obesity did not become prevalent until more modern times.  Looking at graphs that show our fat intake decline can be compared to the rates of heart disease, and you will easily see the inverse relationship between them; fat intake dropped while heart disease sky-rocketed.

And of course, as fats were cut from our plates, we replaced them with “healthier” carbohydrates. As manufacturers and food processing companies worked to make work easier and less laborious for their employees, nutrients were lost.  As nutrient content began to fall, it was decided to supplement or “enrich” many of these foods with some vitamin or mineral to help make the food seem healthier and more nutritious to consumers.  If you can find an older food label from the 1950s and compare to similar food item today, you will see a big difference in nutrient-density; today’s food-like items contain almost no nutrients, no vitamins, no minerals, nothing at all the body actually needs – except for carbohydrates.

And now, we come to the $6 million question – Does the body need all these carbs? Well, let’s look back at the hunter-gatherers a hundred years or more ago – even thousands of years ago.  What carbs did they eat? Where did our founding pioneers obtain their carbs?  What foods did the Native Americans thrive on?  Looking back over hundreds of years, we can see that our ancestors primarily consumed proteins and fats – both of which were generally accessible year-round.  During summer/fall seasons, there were some carbohydrates to be found in the fields & orchards – but they were SEASONAL and only consumed as special treats.  These high carb-content foods were very rare on the family table, and breads/grains were a real treat due to the prolonged growing season and space required for farming them.  It wasn’t until after WWII that industry began seeing food manufacturing as a money-making business; most families and communities farmed nearly every food item consumed.  Families and communities bartered and traded foods & services; there just wasn’t room in the economy or the daily life for many “frivolities” to be eaten.  Farmers and plant workers thrived on proteins and fats for sustenance and energy.  Breads and cereals did not provide long-lasting energy for the typical 12-16-hour day, with rarely a “lunchbreak” for a mid-day meal.  Jerky, or dried meats, was easy to keep in a pocket or bag for a snack “on-the-go.”  While pondering on these thoughts, let’s go back to our question – Does the body need all these carbs?  Our grandparents and great-grandparents will mostly say an unequivocal “NO” to this question because they lived on very few carbs during their entire lifetime.  They did not see much need for them 100 years ago; some of them still keep carb intake to a minimum today, regardless of the “rules” that push high-carb diets on all of us.

Now then, the question becomes, “how many carbs should I eat?” Well, the Standard American Diet (SAD) guidelines typically recommend 250-300 GRAMS of carbs per day for the average American adult.  How much is that, you ask?  Take a look at this graphic from The Noakes Foundation:

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Take a look at the sample menu; substitute some of your own favorites and if you’re really brave, look up the exact carb content on your food labels. This typical diet contains over 300 grams of carbohydrates for 1 day, AND an additional 34 teaspoons of refined sugars, for an ADDITIONAL 137 grams of carbs – the SAD is truly sad for Americans. Consider that the average body only needs 1 TEASPOON of glucose in the bloodstream ALL DAY.  This sample meal plan for 1 day contains a total of 466 grams of carbohydrates – all of which will be converted rather quickly into glucose, floating around in the bloodstream and triggering all sorts of body processes in hopes of lowering the blood glucose level as quickly as possible.  The intake of glucose triggers the pancreas to suddenly secrete a load of insulin which is programmed to seek out glucose molecules and transport them out of the bloodstream quickly; while the insulin is taking the glucose OUT of the bloodstream, it is taking the glucose INTO cells to be stored as fat; over time, this one process causes weight gain and insulin resistance.  Insulin resistance is what happens when the body is overworked and forced to make and secrete a lot of insulin.  I tell this story to my patients when I see them in the office:  If you are working on an assembly-line and your rate of work is comfortable to you and you meet production at the end of your day, you feel good that you were able to meet your goals and produce a good, high-quality product.  But what happens when your boss tells you to DOUBLE production?  Do you work faster? Do you work more carelessly?  Does your faster work put out high-quality product?  Do you feel bad at the end of your day because you did not meet your standards?  A similar process occurs when the pancreas is forced to make too much insulin to manage the extremely high glucose intake and the insulin becomes less and less effective, even though MORE quantity is being produced.  This one faulty product (poor quality insulin) can cause a myriad of chemical & hormonal imbalances within the body, contributing to all sorts of chronic diseases, including type 2 diabetes.

So, if 400+ grams of carbs per day is actually RECOMMENDED, it’s no wonder that over 2/3 Americans are overweight & diabetic. How can we change this plan?  Well, the dietary guidelines will be reviewed again in 5 years – that’s a LONG time to wait.  You can change YOUR diet TODAY!  I like helping people understand where all the carbohydrates are hiding – they are in MANY foods that experts have claimed to be HEALTHY for the past 50 years.  I start by helping people see the worst sources of carbs – the junk foods, the soda, the sugary treats, the boxed cereals loaded with sugars, and fast foods.  Once people are aware of the sources, it is MUCH easier to start making healthy choices.  But how many grams of carbs do we actually need?  Some current experts say we need as little as 10 grams per day; others say that staying under 50 grams is best.  My suggestion to my patients is to start where you are and try to eat 100 grams LESS for a week or 2 and then decrease again and again, learning as you go.  Read labels, identify foods with high carb content and start cutting portion sizes until that food is used/gone.  I tell people that it’s important to start right where you are and to NOT expect yourself to make such a massive change overnight.  While some people are able to go “cold-turkey” off carbs, many find it a serious addiction and very difficult to drop such a huge amount in a short time.  The best method of understanding where you are, is to record your intake; if you have a smartphone or tablet, there are many apps available.  My favorite app for this task is Cronometer because it’s accurate and pretty easy to use.  Once you’ve recorded 3-4 days of intake, it’s easy to see what your macros are.  Your macros are your macronutrients – carbs, fats, & proteins.  These are the only 3 major nutrients we consume.

Back to our original questions: 1) What is low carb eating?  Low carb eating is a way of eating that drastically cuts carbohydrate intake to less than 100 grams per day; some plans and experts recommend MUCH less, but the general definition of low-carb is less than 100 grams per day.  2) Is low-carb unhealthy?  After reading this article, I hope your answer is a resounding “NO, low-carb eating is very healthy.”  Eliminating wasteful, highly processed, very chemical-laden food like items actually rids your body of toxins and chemicals that are often linked to chronic diseases and cancers.  3)  What do I eat if I’m eating low carb?  This question is often one of the most commonly asked questions of all of us trying to teach this method of eating.  Eliminating carbohydrates typically means no longer consuming any type of bread, rice, corn, potato, wheat, pasta, cracker, cereal, chip, juice, & most milk.  Reviewing your daily intake record, you may find that much of your intake consists of these foods – a VERY common dilemma!  However, I provide a list of resources to my patients, and will add them at the end here.  I typically recommend eating eggs, bacon, unsweet sausage, most meat in small portions, and non-starchy vegetables, and all of it cooked and covered in healthy fats like REAL butter – NOT margarine.  Other health fats are listed here:

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My favorite method of cooking veggies is to roast them! Ahhhhh, so delish and easy to make; just chop into small fairly evenly-sized pieces and season to taste. I shake them in a large storage bag with lite olive oil to cover, then pour onto a large cookie sheet and bake on about 375 – 400 degrees for about 20 minutes or just until edges begin to slightly brown.  Remove from oven and serve immediately.  I also often serve with a small bowl of butter for dipping while eating.  Trying to change our 60++% carb intake to 70% fat intake can take quite a while to understand AND implement.  If we could learn to consume mostly fats with small portions of foods, we could nearly eliminate chronic diseases & medication use, and we could change the face of health care, while extending life span AND improving quality of life.  Now, tell me, who wouldn’t like that?

Take a look at some of these resources and do your own research before deciding what you should do about carb intake.

References, Books, Websites, & Recipe sites for Low Carb Lifestyle

Books:

The Art & Science of Low Carb Living

Cholesterol Clarity

Wheat Belly

Grain Brain

Keto Clarity

The Diabetes Solution

Effortless Healing

Websites:

www.ruled.me                                                  www.dietdoctor.com

www.ketonurses.wordpress.com             www.authoritynutrition.com

www.mercola.com                                          www.ditchthecarbs.com

www.livinlavidalowcarb.com                    Facebook group – Reversing Diabetes

www.lowcarbconversations.com

www.buttermakesyourpantsfalloff.com

FREE YouTube Videos: Dr. Sarah Hallberg             Steve Phinney & Jeff Volek

Dr. Richard Bernstein            Dr. Eric Westman

Bob Briggs (Butter Bob)        Jimmy Moore

Recipes:    www.alldayidreamaboutfood.com

www.peaceloveandlowcarb.com

www.joyfilledeats.com

www.nobunplease.com

www.ibreatheimhungry.com